Dagbladet cartoon slammed for being anti-Semitic / News in brief / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Dagbladet cartoon slammed for being anti-Semitic. Oslo’s Jewish community and the Norwegian Centre Against Racism strongly reprehend a cartoon published by tabloid Dagbladet depicting Jews torturing children. Jewish community spokesperson Ervin Kohn said he is planning to make a complaint to the Press Complaints Commission (PFU) about the cartoon saying which appeared on 28 May this year. “The illustration falls into a very old tradition that dates back to the Middle Ages, where Jews were accused of killing Christian children and use their blood in religious rituals,” he told Christian newspaper Vårt Land, Monday.

norwayanti-semitism, jewishcommunityoslo



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS

07:58:08 — Friday, 25th April, 2014

News in brief Article

LATEST:

Dagbladet cartoon slammed for being anti-Semitic

Published on Monday, 10th June, 2013 at 19:20 under the news in brief category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

Oslo’s Jewish community and the Norwegian Centre Against Racism strongly reprehend a cartoon published by tabloid Dagbladet depicting Jews torturing children.



Jewish community spokesperson Ervin Kohn said he is planning to make a complaint to the Press Complaints Commission (PFU) about the cartoon saying which appeared on 28 May this year.

“The illustration falls into a very old tradition that dates back to the Middle Ages, where Jews were accused of killing Christian children and use their blood in religious rituals,” he told Christian newspaper Vårt Land, Monday.

Mr Kohn says he has received comments from people abroad about the cartoon and believes there was little reaction in Norway due to the limited number of people who have seen it.

The drawing has several other details that include torture and impaling a child’s head.

Dagbladet’s editor John Arne Markussen has defended publishing the cartoon, however, saying that people are reading too much into it, leaving “little room for nuances”.

“The cartoon’s underlying point is that you can reject criticism or discussion if you can place attitudes and actions under the umbrella of faith. We believe it is an issue that certainly belongs in the public debate,” the paper’s 3 June op-ed reads.

Centre Against Racism leader Rune Berglund Steen stated that “The cartoon lies problematically close to anti-Semitic caricatures we've seen throughout history. It indicates a form of Jewish wickedness, and the newspaper failed when it was printed.”

Vårt Land reports John Arne Markussen apologises if anyone feels offended, but believes the drawing’s them is so important that one must look beyond emotions.




Like this article? Show your appreciation.

Published on Monday, 10th June, 2013 at 19:20 under the news in brief category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: norwayanti-semitism, jewishcommunityoslo.


Leave a Comment

Please refrain from link dropping, keywords, offensive words or spamming. Comments are moderated, we reserve the right not to publish your comment.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Using a mobile to view this page? Click here to view our mobile optimised version.

Support the ForeignerMoney

If you enjoyed this article, please consider supporting the Foreigner by donating using Pay Pal or credit/debit card.

Donate icon