Asylum seekers abandon Norway / News / The Foreigner

Asylum seekers abandon Norway. Minister of Justice Knut Storberget’s crackdown on refugees seems to be working, but at what cost? Norway has now one of the lowest numbers of asylum seekers in the whole of Europe. “A total of 43 million people are displaced worldwide, and the number is increasing every year. The government has succeeded with its scare policies. People in need of protection apply to countries where they believe they can stay, and these restrictive measures mean fewer believe they have a chance in Norway,” Elisabeth Rasmusson, Secretary General of the Norwegian Refugee Council (Flyktninghjelpen) tells Dagsavisen. Fresh figures from the IGC (Intergovernmental Consultations on Migration, Asylum and Refugees) show Norway leads the decline in refugees this year, according to the UDI (Norwegian Directorate of Immigration).

knut, storberget, justice, minister, asylum, refugees, elisabeth, rasmusson, norwegian, refugee, council, igc, ida, boerresen, udi, directorate, immigration



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS

00:11:23 — Thursday, 24th July, 2014

News Article

LATEST:

Asylum seekers abandon Norway

Published on Tuesday, 7th September, 2010 at 13:18 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 7th September 2010 at 13:31.

Minister of Justice Knut Storberget’s crackdown on refugees seems to be working, but at what cost? Norway has now one of the lowest numbers of asylum seekers in the whole of Europe.

Knut Storberget talks about drug treatment
Knut Storberget talks about drug treatment
Photo: Ministry of Justice/Flickr


“A total of 43 million people are displaced worldwide, and the number is increasing every year. The government has succeeded with its scare policies. People in need of protection apply to countries where they believe they can stay, and these restrictive measures mean fewer believe they have a chance in Norway,” Elisabeth Rasmusson, Secretary General of the Norwegian Refugee Council (Flyktninghjelpen) tells Dagsavisen.

Fresh figures from the IGC (Intergovernmental Consultations on Migration, Asylum and Refugees) show Norway leads the decline in refugees this year, according to the UDI (Norwegian Directorate of Immigration).

5,311 people have applied for asylum in Norway so far, whilst Sweden has received 18,300 applications.

“There is a connection between Norway’s more restrictive policies and the decline in the number of asylum seekers, not least when it comes to Family Reunification (Familiegjenforening). There was a report last year showing why refugees chose Norway.

“One of the conclusions is that people perceive Norway as being an attractive country for individuals in need of protection. Nevertheless, we now see the new policy of tightening its asylum policy has resulted in fewer applications. The report showed that ‘Norway is good now’, but perhaps we aren’t anymore,” says UDI Director Ida Børresen.




Like this article? Show your appreciation.

Published on Tuesday, 7th September, 2010 at 13:18 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 7th September 2010 at 13:31.

This post has the following tags: knut, storberget, justice, minister, asylum, refugees, elisabeth, rasmusson, norwegian, refugee, council, igc, ida, boerresen, udi, directorate, immigration.


Leave a Comment

Please refrain from link dropping, keywords, offensive words or spamming. Comments are moderated, we reserve the right not to publish your comment.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Using a mobile to view this page? Click here to view our mobile optimised version.

Support the ForeignerMoney

If you enjoyed this article, please consider supporting the Foreigner by donating using Pay Pal or credit/debit card.

Donate icon