Foreigners fan eastern Oslo home prices / News / The Foreigner

Foreigners fan eastern Oslo home prices. Among discussions foreign names lead to few job interviews, immigrants are pushing up Oslo property prices in five of Oslo’s 15 districts by up to 11 percent. The Norwegian-dominated ones have a lower price-growth this year compared to last, reports say. Flat prices in three of what business daily Dagens Næringsliv (DN) reports as “Oslo’s five most prominent immigrant districts” have higher price-rises on flats this year in comparison to 2011. Statistics Norway’s (SSB) officials define these as being Søndre Nordstrand, Alna, Stovner, Grorud, and Bjerke. Over 40 percent are immigrants here.

oslopropertyprices, osloimmigration



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS

10:35:55 — Thursday, 23rd October, 2014

News Article

LATEST:

Foreigners fan eastern Oslo home prices

Published on Tuesday, 27th November, 2012 at 14:32 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 28th November 2012 at 15:20.

Among discussions foreign names lead to few job interviews, immigrants are pushing up Oslo property prices in five of Oslo’s 15 districts by up to 11 percent. The Norwegian-dominated ones have a lower price-growth this year compared to last, reports say.

House on lists
House on lists
Photo: Daft_Lion_Studio/Istockphotos


Flat prices in three of what business daily Dagens Næringsliv (DN) reports as “Oslo’s five most prominent immigrant districts” have higher price-rises on flats this year in comparison to 2011.

Statistics Norway’s (SSB) officials define these as being Søndre Nordstrand, Alna, Stovner, Grorud, and Bjerke. Over 40 percent are immigrants here.

Four of the districts are geographically located in the northern part of Oslo municipality but considered to be in ‘Oslo East’ rather than ‘Oslo West’, along with southeastern-located Søndre Nordstrand.

“Firstly, I don’t consider myself an immigrant”, says Khalique Rana, a Pakistani-born Norwegian citizen, “I’m a person who has moved here (‘innflytter’, in Norwegian],” he tells DN.

The 32-year-old, whose mother is from Pakistan and his father from India, owns an approximately 6-year-old flat in Grorud.

“I didn’t wander here when I came [to Norway] the first time [either]. We’ll be arranging the Norwegian Taekwondo Championships, and I’m looking forward to being able to show many visitors how nice things are here,” Mr Rana adds.

Earlier articles on The Foreigner have shown that foreigners in general tend to maintain ‘traditional’ east/west nationality patterns, and many so-termed ‘ethnic Norwegians’ move out of areas in what is termed as ‘white flight’.

Premraj Thangavel, born in Sri Lanka and a Swedish national who lives in Grorud tells DN “We do see that some so-called ethnic Norwegians move from here and think it’s a pity. We don’t completely understand why.”

At the same time, the immigrant population size is and will be growing in all of Oslo’s districts, and many Norwegians are positive to this.

Estate agent Eiendomsmegler 1’s Christian Fr. Foss declares many ‘ethnic Norwegians’ want to buy properties in Grorud.

The new-build project manager informs the paper that, “all the ten terraced-house (‘rekkehus’) buyers have foreign names.”

“Nevertheless, several with typically Norwegian surnames were also interested but met up too late to get far enough ahead in the [purchasing] queue.

Property prices in Stovner, Søndre Nordstrand, Bjerke, Alna, and Grorurd have risen an average of between 9 and 11 percent so far this year for a roughly 70 square metre flat compared with that of 2011.

Drammen, with a sizeable immigrant population, has shown a 12 percent increase on the same basis, the highest in the country.




Like this article? Show your appreciation.

Published on Tuesday, 27th November, 2012 at 14:32 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 28th November 2012 at 15:20.

This post has the following tags: oslopropertyprices, osloimmigration.


Leave a Comment

Please refrain from link dropping, keywords, offensive words or spamming. Comments are moderated, we reserve the right not to publish your comment.

blog comments powered by Disqus

You might also be interested in...

 
Oslo property two times Copenhagen’s


Using a mobile to view this page? Click here to view our mobile optimised version.

Support the ForeignerMoney

If you enjoyed this article, please consider supporting the Foreigner by donating using Pay Pal or credit/debit card.

Donate icon



  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!