Norway foreigner population ‘explosion’ puts ‘honesty officials’ under pressure / News / The Foreigner

Norway foreigner population ‘explosion’ puts ‘honesty officials’ under pressure. Population register bureaucrats are complaining of overload amongst a plethora of new non-Norway resident births. Concerns about cheating form part of this some 25 to 75 annual birth-residency ratio. Officials at ‘Folkeregisteret’ call for reforms to what they complain is the antiquated system. in order to combat identity frauds. A mere 60,000 of the 220,000 residents registered last year were born in Norway. The rest was immigrants. This figure was due to the EU open borders system, work migrants, and immigrants who came on family reunion.

norwayimmigration, norwaytax, benefitsfraudnorway



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17:12:11 — Thursday, 18th December, 2014

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Norway foreigner population ‘explosion’ puts ‘honesty officials’ under pressure

Published on Monday, 8th April, 2013 at 16:58 under the news category, by Asgeir Ueland.

Population register bureaucrats are complaining of overload amongst a plethora of new non-Norway resident births.

Norwegian border
Norwegian border
Photo: Hardo Müller/Flickr


Concerns about cheating form part of this some 25 to 75 annual birth-residency ratio. Officials at ‘Folkeregisteret’ call for reforms to what they complain is the antiquated system. in order to combat identity frauds.

A mere 60,000 of the 220,000 residents registered last year were born in Norway. The rest was immigrants. This figure was due to the EU open borders system, work migrants, and immigrants who came on family reunion.

The tax authorities also reported that attempts at tax fraud has doubled over the last year, mainly due to use of false ids. These officials also claimed the false IDs stemmed from people who claimed to be EU residents but were not, in most cases, according to Aftenposten. 

To combat this trend, the rubber stampers have sent a list of suggestion to Finance Minister Sigbjørn Johnsen. The first implies there will be various registration classes, from A to C.

Grade A will likely cover people who have registered through biometrics or fingerprints, B, people who have had their identity checked by tax authorities, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), or the police, and C for people whose identity is uncertain.

There are also calls for a closer cooperation between the different public offices, banks and police, and an increase in automatic registration and digitalising contact details.

Moreover, tax authorities obtaining a so called D-number - national insurance/identification number – is too easy on false premises.

About five million people have a national insurance number in Norway today, which implies that they are or have been staying legally in the country for more than six months.

On top of that, Aftenposten, who ends their article with that they “have documented an extensive problem of false identities in Norway through several articles”, reports some 1.25 million persons hold a D-number, implying a temporarily stay or connection to the country.



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Published on Monday, 8th April, 2013 at 16:58 under the news category, by Asgeir Ueland.

This post has the following tags: norwayimmigration, norwaytax, benefitsfraudnorway.


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