Norway opposition fights EU Data Retention Directive / News / The Foreigner

Norway opposition fights EU Data Retention Directive. Politicians from three of Norway’s political Parties pledge to continue their anti-DRD campaign. 2011’s compromise between Labour (Ap) and the Conservatives (H) – currently the largest opposition Party – led to the controversial legislation being passed after some postponement. The EU’s DRD requires all telephone companies and internet providers to store information on consumers’ traffic for at least six months.

dataretentiondirective, eu, norway



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS

21:17:45 — Thursday, 24th July, 2014

News Article

LATEST:

Norway opposition fights EU Data Retention Directive

Published on Thursday, 25th July, 2013 at 09:31 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

Politicians from three of Norway’s political Parties pledge to continue their anti-DRD campaign.

DRD demonstration, Oslo
Protestors campaigning against the Data Retention Directive outside parliamentDRD demonstration, Oslo
Photo: Jess Chandler


2011’s compromise between Labour (Ap) and the Conservatives (H) – currently the largest opposition Party – led to the controversial legislation being passed after some postponement.

The EU’s DRD requires all telephone companies and internet providers to store information on consumers’ traffic for at least six months.

Those in favour of the legislation, amongst others the Police Security Service (PST), say it will help tackle elements of serious crime.

Critics believe it to be a violation of privacy. All other Parties voted against passing the DRD in parliament.

In her 5th April column on The Foreigner Jenny Klinge MP, Centre Party (Sp) representative for the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Justice, raised concerns that the stored data might be open to misuse.

The DRD is not yet adopted under Norwegian legislation. At the same time, Progress (FrP), the Christian Democrats (KrF), and Liberals (V) have vowed to persevere fighting for revoking the parliament-approved DRD, whoever is in power after polling day this September.

“Reasons for another round against the corresponding regulations in Norway become even stronger as the DRD is increasingly questioned in the European Court of Justice several EU countries,” Hans Antonsen, the Liberals’ primary Aust and Vest-Agder counties’ candidate, told Nationen.

Ketil Solvik-Olsen, deputy leader of the Progress Party, also expressed concerns over the legislation, arguing it gives the state too much power at the individual’s expense.

“We’re not afraid to vote down something the Conservatives and Labour have managed to achieve in the past should the parliamentary majority shift,” declared Mr Solvik-Olsen.

“Our goal is that the Directive will not come into effect”, declared KrF MP Kjell Ingolf Ropstad, “the Data Inspectorate says the DRD is a further step into a surveillance society.”

“The Christian Democrats don’t want a situation where privacy is sacrificed at the altar of good intentions,” he adds, calling for greater use of Norway’s EEA agreement veto right

Conservative deputy leader Jan Tore Sanner remarks that “there’s a good tradition in Norway to respect parliament’s decisions, so the DRD will continue to stand [as a piece of legislation] with a non-socialist government.”

The EU Court of Justice will decide the DRD’s legality this autumn.




Like this article? Show your appreciation.

Published on Thursday, 25th July, 2013 at 09:31 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

This post has the following tags: dataretentiondirective, eu, norway.


Leave a Comment

Please refrain from link dropping, keywords, offensive words or spamming. Comments are moderated, we reserve the right not to publish your comment.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Using a mobile to view this page? Click here to view our mobile optimised version.

Support the ForeignerMoney

If you enjoyed this article, please consider supporting the Foreigner by donating using Pay Pal or credit/debit card.

Donate icon