Norway spy’s archive found in Britain / News / The Foreigner

Norway spy’s archive found in Britain. Secret documents collected by a Norwegian spy during the Second World War have been discovered hidden in a UK garage. Sven Sømme was a member of the Norwegian resistance when he was captured in 1944 but escaped before he could be executed. 900 German soldiers tracked him for 200 miles with dogs, and he swung from tree to tree to avoid leaving footprints in the snow.

norwayresistance, rjukanheavywaterplant, wwiinorway



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08:39:22 — Thursday, 2nd October, 2014

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Norway spy’s archive found in Britain

Published on Friday, 5th April, 2013 at 07:44 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 5th April 2013 at 20:16.

Secret documents collected by a Norwegian spy during the Second World War have been discovered hidden in a UK garage.

Sven Sømme portrait
Norwegian resistance spy Sven Sømme escaped 200 miles across mountains to Sweden pursued by 900 German soldiers before eventually fleeing to BritainSven Sømme portrait
Photo: ©BNPS.CO.UK


Sven Sømme was a member of the Norwegian resistance when he was captured in 1944 but escaped before he could be executed.

900 German soldiers tracked him for 200 miles with dogs, and he swung from tree to tree to avoid leaving footprints in the snow.

He fled eastwards from western Norway’s Molde through Eikesdalen, both in Møre og Romsdal County, over the Rondane mountains in Hedmark and Oppland Counties, to Engerdal (Oppland), then to Sweden.

His daughter, Hertfordshire resident 60-year-old Ellie Targett, found the documents from his time in the resistance while clearing out the garage.

Items included envelopes with maps and reports hidden beneath the stamps and the Nazi warrant issued for his arrest.

“I scanned one onto my computer and blew it up and it was instructions from the resistance movement to photograph the German U-boat bases that led to him being captured,” The Daily Mail was told.

Sømme sent the Allies microfilms with pictures he took hidden under postage stamps on letters.

Talking of his capture in 1944, she said to NRK, “My father hid his camera and got the Germans to believe that he was looking at birds. But the Germans were waiting for him when he was leaving. They had found the camera and there was no doubt that he would be executed.”

Sven’s brother Iacob, a leader of resistance movement Milorg, was executed in 1943 for his involvement in the sabotage of the Vemork hydroelectric heavy water plant at Rjukan in Telemark. He was later exposed, arrested, and sentenced to death for his work for the Resistance.

Other brother Knut was also a member of the resistance, but fled abroad some two months later.

Sven Sømme eventually arrived in Britain after his dramatic escape. He was given a private audience with HRH King Haakon VII of Norway who was in exile in London.

The Norwegian resistance member later met and married his wife Primrose. In addition to Ellie, the couple had children Yule and Bertie.

Sven Sømme died of cancer in 1961, aged 58.




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Published on Friday, 5th April, 2013 at 07:44 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 5th April 2013 at 20:16.

This post has the following tags: norwayresistance, rjukanheavywaterplant, wwiinorway.


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