PST boss challenges terror laws / News / The Foreigner

PST boss challenges terror laws. Norway’s Police Security Service (PST) Director Janne Kristiansen wants to change terror legislation, classified letters reveal. The move, called ‘Lex Breivik’, comes following the controversial handling of events surrounding the July 22 massacre. As part of efforts to pursue lone wolf terrorists, Janne Kristiansen wrote she wished wider powers record Internet-based religious and political activity. “The main challenge lies in the effort to uncover the intention to carry out terror,” VG reports her as saying.

jannekristiansen, andersbehringbreivik, norwayterrorlaws



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17:12:54 — Wednesday, 2nd September, 2015

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PST boss challenges terror laws

Published on Thursday, 24th November, 2011 at 09:44 under the news category, by John Price   .

Norway’s Police Security Service (PST) Director Janne Kristiansen wants to change terror legislation, classified letters reveal.

Police Security Service building (PST)
Police Security Service building (PST)
Photo: Hans-Petter Fjeld/Wikimedia Commons


The move, called ‘Lex Breivik’, comes following the controversial handling of events surrounding the July 22 massacre. As part of efforts to pursue lone wolf terrorists, Janne Kristiansen wrote she wished wider powers record Internet-based religious and political activity.

“The main challenge lies in the effort to uncover the intention to carry out terror,” VG reports her as saying.

PST Communications Trond Hugubakken confirms, “The PST has sent an extensive letter with proposed changes to terrorism legislation and methodology. We have also sent a letter regarding the barriers between the PST and the Military’s intelligence service.”

Security watchdog the Norwegian Parliamentary Intelligence Oversight Committee (NPIOC) EOS-committee has not concluded about Ms Kristiansen’s proposal, but has had to rap the PST on the knuckles several times in the past. In 2010, the PST was instructed to delete 15 entries about individuals based on their religious, philosophical, or political convictions.

Law bans storing these details, but previous reports suggest these entries could have helped discover Anders Behring Breivik earlier. The PST is only allowed to save information for up to four months before being bound to delete it.

The Ministry of Justice had no comment to make about Ms Kristiansen’s proposal when contacted by The Foreigner.




Published on Thursday, 24th November, 2011 at 09:44 under the news category, by John Price   .

This post has the following tags: jannekristiansen, andersbehringbreivik, norwayterrorlaws.


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