Statoil gave into US pressures to withdraw from Iran / News / The Foreigner

Statoil gave into US pressures to withdraw from Iran. Statoil representatives informed the public they would not pursue further investments in Iran while reassuring them that US government had no involvement in the corporate decisions regarding investment in foreign markets. In August 2008, Statoil CEO Helge Lund told reporters at a press conference that the company would gradually withdraw from Iran, after covering their investments costs to date. He denied that US government pressures had any impact on Statoil’s decision-making. However, WikiLeaks documents revealed by Aftenposten show that immediately after the press conference, Mr. Lund called former US Ambassador to Oslo, Benson Whitney, and allegedly told him that he was clear in his message to the public that Statoil would eventually leave the world’s largest gas field, the Iranian South Pars.

statoil, helge, lund, wikileaks, us, embassy, oslo, benson, whitney, iran, south, pars,



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS

09:45:26 — Friday, 19th September, 2014

News Article

LATEST:

Statoil gave into US pressures to withdraw from Iran

Published on Thursday, 30th December, 2010 at 18:23 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.

Statoil representatives informed the public they would not pursue further investments in Iran while reassuring them that US government had no involvement in the corporate decisions regarding investment in foreign markets.

Helge Lund, CEO StatoilHydro, 2009
Helge Lund, CEO StatoilHydro, 2009
Photo: Fotogjengen,Studentersamfundet,Trondheim


In August 2008, Statoil CEO Helge Lund told reporters at a press conference that the company would gradually withdraw from Iran, after covering their investments costs to date. He denied that US government pressures had any impact on Statoil’s decision-making.

However, WikiLeaks documents revealed by Aftenposten show that immediately after the press conference, Mr. Lund called former US Ambassador to Oslo, Benson Whitney, and allegedly told him that he was clear in his message to the public that Statoil would eventually leave the world’s largest gas field, the Iranian South Pars.

According to the US cable, Mr. Whitney described Mr. Lund as “extremely proactive” in convincing the media that further investments in Iran would not take place.

Furthermore, the former Ambassador’s notes read that “StatoilHydro had been, and would continue to be, extremely open with the USG (United States Government) as to the company´s Iranian plans.”

According to the leaked documents, Mr Whitney expressed serious concerns over Statoil’s investments at a lunch with Mr Lund in 2007, despite assurances they had no plans of Iranian expansion.

Helge Lund informed him in confidence that the company is “conducting a low profile, but insincere, dialogue with Iranian authorities on future projects to forestall potentially hostile actions against its current investments”.

Statoil has refused to comment on the matter.

The US government has been pressuring both Norwegian commercial and governmental institutions to abstain from any investments in Iran, ever since Norway adopted a regulation in 2007 regarding the illegality of funding any activity supporting the development of nuclear weapons.



Like this article? Show your appreciation.

Published on Thursday, 30th December, 2010 at 18:23 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.

This post has the following tags: statoil, helge, lund, wikileaks, us, embassy, oslo, benson, whitney, iran, south, pars, .


Leave a Comment

Please refrain from link dropping, keywords, offensive words or spamming. Comments are moderated, we reserve the right not to publish your comment.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Using a mobile to view this page? Click here to view our mobile optimised version.

Support the ForeignerMoney

If you enjoyed this article, please consider supporting the Foreigner by donating using Pay Pal or credit/debit card.

Donate icon