US Oslo embassy personnel may have had weapons / News / The Foreigner

US Oslo embassy personnel may have had weapons. American Foreign Service documents show various monitoring groups at its embassies around the world could have been armed. The U.S. has already embarked upon the process, according to documents in NRK’s possession. “It’s have had the opportunity. They could have been carrying concealed weapons in high threat level situations or exceptional circumstances, providing the embassy and the host nation granted them permission,” Vegard Valter Hansen, senior adviser at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI), tells NRK.

usembassyoslo, timothymoore, sdu, simas, nupi, vegardvalterhansen, presidentbarackobama, nobelpeaceprize



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS

11:30:59 — Wednesday, 17th September, 2014

News Article

LATEST:

US Oslo embassy personnel may have had weapons

Published on Friday, 21st January, 2011 at 20:07 under the news category, by Nicoleta Sincan.
Last Updated on 26th January 2011 at 22:16.

American Foreign Service documents show various monitoring groups at its embassies around the world could have been armed.

The U.S. embassy in Oslo, 2005
The U.S. embassy in Oslo, 2005
Photo: ©Bjørn Erik Pedersen/Wikimedia Commons


The U.S. has already embarked upon the process, according to documents in NRK’s possession.

“It’s have had the opportunity. They could have been carrying concealed weapons in high threat level situations or exceptional circumstances, providing the embassy and the host nation granted them permission,” Vegard Valter Hansen, senior adviser at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI), tells NRK.

One group that could have been armed was the U.S. Embassy in Oslo’s Surveillance Detection Unit (SDU), set up following 9/11 to spy on Norwegians.

SDU employees, which included former Norwegian security personnel, recorded sensitive and comprehensive details which was then disseminated by embassy staff, before being registered in the the worldwide anti-terror SIMAS database.

The inquiry into who knew what is still open, partly because the U.S. Department of State has not revoked security employees’ oath of silence. Minister of Justice Knut Storberget has denied knowing the SDU existed.

“It has become known to me that former police personnel have had security assignments at the embassy,” he said during this week’s Parliamentary question session about the affair, adding this happened before he assumed his current post.

Timothy Moore, spokesman for the American Embassy in Oslo says he is unaware any SDU members carried weapons.

“They only have to keep an eye on things and observe, so why should they be armed? SDU members are just regular U.S. embassy employees [and] are paid the same way. Some of them work full-time, others part-time” he said.

Nevertheless, Vegard Valter Hansen believes it possible the group was issued with weapons in special circumstances.

“This may have included President Obama’s Nobel Peace Prize visit in 2010.”




Like this article? Show your appreciation.

Published on Friday, 21st January, 2011 at 20:07 under the news category, by Nicoleta Sincan.
Last updated on 26th January 2011 at 22:16.

This post has the following tags: usembassyoslo, timothymoore, sdu, simas, nupi, vegardvalterhansen, presidentbarackobama, nobelpeaceprize.


Leave a Comment

Please refrain from link dropping, keywords, offensive words or spamming. Comments are moderated, we reserve the right not to publish your comment.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Using a mobile to view this page? Click here to view our mobile optimised version.

Support the ForeignerMoney

If you enjoyed this article, please consider supporting the Foreigner by donating using Pay Pal or credit/debit card.

Donate icon