A year when dignity died / Columns / The Foreigner

The Foreigner A year when dignity died. COMMENTARY: I, perhaps like many, will remember 2016 as being a year which saw open season on dignity. Queensberry Rules for sportsmanlike conduct and public discourse were swept away in less than one round. To name just some events: Russia arrived at the Summer Olympics in Rio di Janeiro with depleted numbers of athletes following doping scandal revelations. A weightlifter from Kyrgyzstan was the first Olympian to be stripped of a medal there, and athletes from China, Brazil, and Moldova were slapped with drugs sanctions.

politics, immigration, xenophobia, sports, olympics, boxing, refugees, asylumseekers, syria, brexit, doping, drugs



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A year when dignity died

Published on Wednesday, 11th January, 2017 at 12:52 under the columns category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 13th January 2017 at 13:53.

COMMENTARY: I, perhaps like many, will remember 2016 as being a year which saw open season on dignity. Queensberry Rules for sportsmanlike conduct and public discourse were swept away in less than one round.



To name just some events:

Russia arrived at the Summer Olympics in Rio di Janeiro with depleted numbers of athletes following doping scandal revelations. A weightlifter from Kyrgyzstan was the first Olympian to be stripped of a medal there, and athletes from China, Brazil, and Moldova were slapped with drugs sanctions.

The US Presidential Election Campaign, while traditionally a slanging match, contained xenophobic and misogynistic rhetoric – that won. The FBI’s investigation into supposedly new Clinton emails, just 11 days before polling day, resulted in no apology coming from security officials.

Brexit was a scaremongering campaign by both sides. But just hours after the result of national referendum was announced, President of the European Parliament Martin Schultz joined Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission, in an undignified publicly-stated wish to see Britain leave the EU as soon as possible. EU lawyers spent time trying to find loopholes in the EU’s very own legislation in efforts to allow an informal triggering of Article 50.

Syrian refugees, many of whom died in their perilous journey across the Mediterranean to Europe, had to flee their war-torn country. Some ended up in a camp in Calais; which was dismantled. Others came to Norway. While the Scandinavian country currently has a visibly dignity-stripping immigration policy, with very many refugees and asylum seekers being sent out, Rightists and Leftists agree on most issues – just with differences of opinion regarding rhetoric.

As 2014 joint Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai puts it: “people have a right to be treated with dignity”.

Dignity is one of the most deep-seated qualities and characteristics of humanity. Dignity, once lost, is hard to recover.




Published on Wednesday, 11th January, 2017 at 12:52 under the columns category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 13th January 2017 at 13:53.

This post has the following tags: politics, immigration, xenophobia, sports, olympics, boxing, refugees, asylumseekers, syria, brexit, doping, drugs.





  
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