All the world’s a stage to Ryanair / Columns / The Foreigner

The Foreigner All the world’s a stage to Ryanair. COMMENTARY: “Put money in thy purse.” – Othello, Act I, Scene III. The low-cost Irish airline is playing the role of victim. Using language in their press release that is reminiscent of a soliloquy from a Shakespearean tragedy (or comedy), Ryanair is complaining about the consequences of what it terms is “an environmentally-unfriendly tax” on tickets. According to David O’Brien, Ryanair’s Chief Commercial Officer, it “unfairly penalises passengers on efficient, green, airlines such as Ryanair in favour of passengers on high fare, half empty, gas guzzling airlines, and destroys the cost competitiveness of privately owned Oslo Rygge Airport in favour of the state-owned Avinor monopoly.”

ryanair, rygge, shakespeare, closures, flights, airfares, tax, paywall



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All the world’s a stage to Ryanair

Published on Wednesday, 1st June, 2016 at 18:37 under the columns category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 8th June 2016 at 19:04.

COMMENTARY: “Put money in thy purse.” – Othello, Act I, Scene III.



The low-cost Irish airline is playing the role of victim. Using language in their press release that is reminiscent of a soliloquy from a Shakespearean tragedy (or comedy), Ryanair is complaining about the consequences of what it terms is “an environmentally-unfriendly tax” on tickets.

According to David O’Brien, Ryanair’s Chief Commercial Officer, it “unfairly penalises passengers on efficient, green, airlines such as Ryanair in favour of passengers on high fare, half empty, gas guzzling airlines, and destroys the cost competitiveness of privately owned Oslo Rygge Airport in favour of the state-owned Avinor monopoly.”

“This tax will severely damage Norwegian tourism, particularly around regional airports. The Norwegian Government has instantly made Norway uncompetitive and less attractive to airlines and tourists,” he says in a statement.

Ryanair announced today that it will be “forced to close” its base at eastern Norway’s Moss Rygge Airport from 29th October this year. Remaining operations will be moved to Torp, and thrice-daily Oslo Gardermoen-London Stanstead flights will commence one day later. Vilnius will be graced by the airline’s aircraft once a day from the same Norway airport.

Today’s performance by Ryanair brought the final curtain down on a relatively long-running affair. Norway’s Centre-Right government has been firm in its resolve to introduce an extra passenger tax – despite noises from Ryanair. Last year, Rygge director Pål Tandberg warned that introducing it could mean the death of the airport. Several airlines, including Widerøe, Norwegian, and Ryanair, announced route revisions as a result of the new tax which takes effect today – Norway’s Ministry of Finance says it is a fiscal, not environmental tax.

Rygge’s executive board has announced that the civilian part of the airport is to close from 1st November. A two-thirds traffic volume loss meant that the facility was no longer commercially viable. Ryanair has cancelled 16 of its routes from there and moved eight to Torp.

While the base closure is a sad fact for the some 1,000 who will lose their jobs, Ryanair has based just four of its aircraft at Rygge. The rest are stationed at other airports in Europe, and some of these will serve the Norwegian market from 30th October. These European airports are ones which give Ryanair a higher yield.

The passenger tax row, which is over as much as 88 kroner (including VAT) per ticket, is also about administrative costs and refunds. People travelling on domestic flights in Norway and then onward on international ones would have already paid this sum. Ryanair would have to prove that the passenger has done this in order to be exempted from either collecting it once more, or from refunding them this amount. Return travel from a country without a passenger tax would not be subject to the Norwegian one.

And as the new tax applies to all airports in Norway, Ryanair’s repositioning move seems rather a moot point. Nobody, not even the government of Norway, is “forcing” Ryanair to do anything. Ryanair is choosing to reduce its Norwegian traffic by 50 per cent. Moreover, the loss of 1,000 jobs, 900,000 passengers per annum (airline figures), and a closed airport is ideal leverage, which the airline has used for all it is worth.

“Sadly, the Norwegian Government has chosen to sacrifice 1,000 jobs at Oslo Rygge for reasons which defy explanation. This is a black day for Oslo Rygge, for Norway and for Norwegian tourism," declares Ryanair’s David O’Brien.

Lamentably, the matter for Ryanair is more about being in the black.

“All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts.” – As You Like It, Act II, Scene VII.

“Rude am I in my speech, and little blessed with the soft phrase of peace.” – Othello, Act I, Scene III.




Published on Wednesday, 1st June, 2016 at 18:37 under the columns category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 8th June 2016 at 19:04.

This post has the following tags: ryanair, rygge, shakespeare, closures, flights, airfares, tax, paywall.





  
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