Dealing with crises / Columns / The Foreigner

Dealing with crises. Disasters and crises can strike at any time. Norway is not immune to these, either. The 22 July 2011 terrorist attacks revealed numerous gaps in crisis prevention and management. Norway also experiences floods, tsunamis, and earthquakes amongst many others. At the University of Agder, the Centre for Integrated Emergency Management (CIEM) brought the world to Norway to understand how to deal better with crises.

climate, earthquakes, floods, research



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Dealing with crises

Published on Monday, 29th June, 2015 at 09:19 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

Disasters and crises can strike at any time. Norway is not immune to these, either.

ISCRAM 2015
A Networking and poster session at the event.ISCRAM 2015
Photo: Ilan Kelman


The 22 July 2011 terrorist attacks revealed numerous gaps in crisis prevention and management. Norway also experiences floods, tsunamis, and earthquakes amongst many others.

At the University of Agder, the Centre for Integrated Emergency Management (CIEM) brought the world to Norway to understand how to deal better with crises.

From 24-27 May, the southern Norway town of Kristiansand hosted 300 delegates from more than three dozen countries for the 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management (ISCRAM).

The work presented at ISCRAM aims to overcome constraints to effective emergency management. That covers political, organisational, cultural, and technological barriers.

One presentation covered safe havens for livestock and pets during disasters in Colorado. Another paper modelled people's movement after a Tokyo earthquake. An extra session explored crisis mapping following the April earthquake in Nepal.

Using social media to assist with emergency management and response emerged prominently. Researchers and practitioners are keen to use the wealth of material which appears online after a major incident--without becoming overwhelmed by it.

Researchers sought data collected by practitioners. Practitioners requested short, readable summaries from researchers.

ISCRAM's strength emerges from such open, critiquing exchange. The conference creates a space where technology, disasters, information, and research intersect. The ultimate goal is to make society safer.

Ilan Kelman is a Reader in Risk, Resilience and Global Health at University College London.



Published on Monday, 29th June, 2015 at 09:19 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

This post has the following tags: climate, earthquakes, floods, research.





  
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