Hinduism in Norway / Columns / The Foreigner

Hinduism in Norway. Hinduism in Norway is of two sorts: an alternative religion and a diaspora religion. As an alternative religion, Hinduism was first brought to Norway as early as 1914 by a guru, Swami Sri Ananda Acharya (1881-1945). He settled in Alvdal in Østerdalen in Hedmark County and lived there until his death in 1945. There’s a bust of him in the Alvdal Community Centre. There still are Hindus of Norwegian heritage who attend to his teachings. Other international organisations associated with Hindu gurus came into Norway in the late 20th century. These include ISKCON (Hare Krishna), Ananda Marga, Transcendental Meditation, the Mehr Baba Association, and the Osho movement.

norwayreligion, religioninnorway



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Hinduism in Norway

Published on Friday, 9th August, 2013 at 16:20 under the columns category, by M. Michael Brady.
Last Updated on 9th August 2013 at 16:31.

Hinduism in Norway is of two sorts: an alternative religion and a diaspora religion.

Bust of Swami Sri Ananda Acharya
Swami Sri Ananda Acharya first brought Hinduism to NorwayBust of Swami Sri Ananda Acharya
Photo: Anawenda/Wikimedia Commons


As an alternative religion, Hinduism was first brought to Norway as early as 1914 by a guru, Swami Sri Ananda Acharya (1881-1945). He settled in Alvdal in Østerdalen in Hedmark County and lived there until his death in 1945. There’s a bust of him in the Alvdal Community Centre. There still are Hindus of Norwegian heritage who attend to his teachings.

Other international organisations associated with Hindu gurus came into Norway in the late 20th century. These include ISKCON (Hare Krishna), Ananda Marga, Transcendental Meditation, the Mehr Baba Association, and the Osho movement.

Two groups of Hindus brought Hinduism into Norway as a diaspora religion: those who migrated to western countries seeking work or education, and minority group refugees who fled repression and war. The first group comprised mostly Hindus from Punjab and other parts of northern India who settled in the Oslo-Drammen region.

The second was far larger. It included a small group of Gujarati Hindus that Dictator Idi Amin expelled from Uganda in August 1972. Tamil Hindu migrants from Sri Lanka began arriving in small numbers in the 1970s, then in greater numbers after civil war broke out in Sri Lanka in 1983. Today, three-quarters of the Hindus from south Asia living in Norway are Tamil Hindus from Sri Lanka.

There are four Hindu Temples in Norway: Santan Mandir Sabha at Slemmestad near Drammen, Sivasubramanayr Alaym (Norwegian Hindu Centre) at Ammerud in Oslo, Bergen Hindu Sabha at Danmarksplass in Bergen and Sri Tiller Ganesha at Tiller in Trondheim.

Facts:

  • Membership: about 10,000 resident in country, of which 5690 are registered in communities (Statistics Norway 2012).
  • Further information available from the temples including: Sanatan Mandir Sabha, Nyveien 6, 3470 Slemmestad, Tel 31280313 and The Bergen Hindu Sabha, Storetveitveien 5, 5067 Bergen, Tel 55282245.

Editor’s note: We invite readers to read previous articles in this continuing series focusing on religions in Norway: The Lutheran Church, Catholicism, Islam, Judaism, Orthodoxy, Methodism, the Baptist Church, Seventh-day Adventism, The Mormon Church, Jehova’s Witnesses, the Brunstad Christian Church, Pentecostalism, the Quakers, Anglicanism, the American Lutheran Church , the Swedish Church, the German Community, the Salvation Army, Humanism, Bahá’í, and Buddhism.



Published on Friday, 9th August, 2013 at 16:20 under the columns category, by M. Michael Brady.
Last updated on 9th August 2013 at 16:31.

This post has the following tags: norwayreligion, religioninnorway.





  
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