Humanitarianism and disaster risk reduction / Columns / The Foreigner

Humanitarianism and disaster risk reduction. Disaster research continues to be a growing field. This situation is sad because so much is driven by the continuing disasters afflicting the world. Norway has plenty to offer for reducing disaster-related suffering, as demonstrated at a recent conference. "Emergency preparedness and disaster management" ran from 25-26 February 2016, organised by the University of Stavanger's Centre for Risk Management and Societal Safety and hosted by the University of Agder. Presentations combined humanitarianism and disaster risk reduction, including dealing with climate change. Topics included child soldiers, risk governance, and sexual violence. The 2004 tsunami and the Haiti earthquake featured prominently. Information systems and civil-military cooperation were examined.

climatechange, disasterrisk, humanitarianism, research, paywall



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Humanitarianism and disaster risk reduction

Published on Monday, 7th March, 2016 at 10:17 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

Disaster research continues to be a growing field. This situation is sad because so much is driven by the continuing disasters afflicting the world.

Professor David Alexander, UCL
Keynote speaker Professor David Alexander from University College London.Professor David Alexander, UCL
Photo: Ilan Kelman


Norway has plenty to offer for reducing disaster-related suffering, as demonstrated at a recent conference. "Emergency preparedness and disaster management" ran from 25-26 February 2016, organised by the University of Stavanger's Centre for Risk Management and Societal Safety and hosted by the University of Agder.

Presentations combined humanitarianism and disaster risk reduction, including dealing with climate change. Topics included child soldiers, risk governance, and sexual violence. The 2004 tsunami and the Haiti earthquake featured prominently. Information systems and civil-military cooperation were examined.

Senior staff were on the programme alongside newly-minted Masters students. The ability of participants to question and to critique, as well as to answer and to accept critique, was impressive. This independent and critical thinking is essential to research and action.

The presenters demonstrated their commitment to generating new knowledge whilst ensuring that this knowledge aids society. The key is reducing disaster risk, including adapting to climate change, through identifying and tackling the root causes of why disasters happen.

Whereas Norway lags behind many others on climate change adaptation research, this meeting showed the world-class level of work related to humanitarianism, disasters, and their connections. Let's hope that continuing research in these areas will create to a safer world.

Ilan Kelman is a Reader in Risk, Resilience and Global Health at University College London. He presented on links between humanitarianism and disaster risk reduction including climate change adaptation.




Published on Monday, 7th March, 2016 at 10:17 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

This post has the following tags: climatechange, disasterrisk, humanitarianism, research, paywall.





  
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