Looking after Norwegian citizens / Columns / The Foreigner

Looking after Norwegian citizens. Norwegians frequently travel to other countries. What services are offered by the Norwegian government in times of trouble? Norwegian soldiers in Afghanistan, tourists caught up in a disaster, and expatriates through work or retirement all might expect that Oslo would help them if they ask. But does the government have a 'duty of care' to assist? 'The Duty of Care: Protecting Citizens Abroad' is a new three-year project funded by the Research Council of Norway, which just started last month. Led by the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI), a dozen researchers from five countries are examining how Norwegian society can best be protected.

travel, care, insurance, citizenship, norway



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Looking after Norwegian citizens

Published on Thursday, 2nd April, 2015 at 16:55 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman and Nina Græger and Halvard Leira.

Norwegians frequently travel to other countries. What services are offered by the Norwegian government in times of trouble?

Who has post-disaster duty of care for Norwegians?
Who has post-disaster duty of care for Norwegians?
Photo: Ilan Kelman


Norwegian soldiers in Afghanistan, tourists caught up in a disaster, and expatriates through work or retirement all might expect that Oslo would help them if they ask. But does the government have a 'duty of care' to assist?

'The Duty of Care: Protecting Citizens Abroad' is a new three-year project funded by the Research Council of Norway, which just started last month. Led by the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI), a dozen researchers from five countries are examining how Norwegian society can best be protected.

That is especially important as more citizens live and travel outside Norway. While we are producing fundamental science, our work must also be useful to and useable for NGOs, companies, and the governments by providing research-based advice and recommendations.

Imagine that you are a mountain climber in the Andes, without insurance and then rescued by the host country which demands cost reimbursement. Should you go to prison or should Norway step in and pay, only afterwards considering whether to ask you for money?

As a soldier serving Norway under UN or NATO mandates or as an embassy diplomat, who will support you if you are permanently injured or your family if you are killed? If your travel insurance excludes terrorism and you are a tourist hurt in an attack, can you rely on Norway to bring you home?

Duty of care spans a wide diversity of situations. Norway's prominent and respected role in the world means that citizens frequently find themselves experiencing difficulties and in need of help.

Ilan Kelman is a Reader in Risk, Resilience and Global Health at University College London. Nina Græger and Halvard Leira, the project leaders, are Senior Research Fellows at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs.



Published on Thursday, 2nd April, 2015 at 16:55 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman and Nina Græger and Halvard Leira.

This post has the following tags: travel, care, insurance, citizenship, norway.





  
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