Norway youths act for the climate: A musical / Columns / The Foreigner

Norway youths act for the climate: A musical. Climate change, poverty, school, job, cultural clashes, and more. A long list of challenges worries youth today. It is particularly poignant in Norway. A small country with ample wealth, yet struggling with racism, identity, a post-oil future, and the burdens of an planet environmentally ruined by the oil which creates the wealth. Solutions are not easy. They might not exist. But we need to support tomorrow's leaders.

climatechange, norwayclimate



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Norway youths act for the climate: A musical

Published on Friday, 6th September, 2013 at 07:03 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

Climate change, poverty, school, job, cultural clashes, and more. A long list of challenges worries youth today.

Rehearsing Generasjon Lykke in Sagene
Rehearsing Generasjon Lykke in Sagene
Photo: Ilan Kelman


It is particularly poignant in Norway. A small country with ample wealth, yet struggling with racism, identity, a post-oil future, and the burdens of an planet environmentally ruined by the oil which creates the wealth.

Solutions are not easy. They might not exist. But we need to support tomorrow's leaders.

That means working with youth on their own terms. The performing arts represent a way.

Generasjon Lykke (Generation Happiness) is a new, locally written, darkly humorous musical sporting a mishmash of old and new pop songs. It expresses the frustrations of and opportunities for Norwegian youth dealing with identity, sustainability, and the world.

Nearly three dozen kids from Oslo, aged between 8 and 16, are the stars--acting, singing, and dancing their roles to express the concerns and hopes which they live with every day. Loosely based on Alice in Wonderland, the show is a wandering and wondering quest--perhaps for what we all seek.

Irritated by her parents' expectations, the anti-heroine Nora slips through the looking glass into a Kafkaesque dreamscape where everyone strives to be happy, to look happy, to appear happy, and to say always that they are of course inevitably happy forever.

Echoes of Huxley's soma reverberate around the crazy characters--from social media buffs to a triumvirate actually named 'Crazy, Crazier, and Craziest'--who pushes and pulls Nora along her surrealist self-discovery.

Sondheim, the Turtles, Fame, Matilda, and Lady Gaga provide tunes to which Nora marches, belted out by a live on-stage band while the kids stomp through original choreography. All backed by an army of adult volunteers for artistic direction, technical crew, and babysitting.

The same theatre company put on a previous production, Rottefangeren (The Rat Catcher). Tickets can be bought in advance by emailing generasjonlykke@gmail.com. Come out to Oslo Nye Trikkestallen theatre on 21 and 22 September at 2 pm and 6 pm--and learn what your children will not tell you directly about their world view.

Dr. Ilan Kelman is a Senior Research Fellow at the Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslo (CICERO) (and will be backstage for the shows). See http://generasjonlykke.wordpress.com for more information (in Norwegian only).



Published on Friday, 6th September, 2013 at 07:03 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

This post has the following tags: climatechange, norwayclimate.





  
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