Norway’s oil industry: global perspectives, local views / Columns / The Foreigner

Norway’s oil industry: global perspectives, local views. The Barents Sea is open for business. Or so believes the Norwegian government. Proposals were announced in mid-March for petroleum exploration in dozens of offshore Arctic sites. Public consultations follow before finalising the plans for applications later this year. Environmentalists immediately condemned all northern drilling. Arctic petroleum risks are not fully understood. An under-ice spill or a tanker sinking in a storm would be environmentally catastrophic with huge clean-up challenges.

oil, barentssea, climate, energy, arctic, globalwarming, co2, greenhousegases, paywall



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



Columns Article

LATEST:

Norway’s oil industry: global perspectives, local views

Published on Friday, 31st March, 2017 at 17:35 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

The Barents Sea is open for business. Or so believes the Norwegian government.

Rainbow and sea
Should the oil pot-of-gold under Northern Norway's seas be exploited?Rainbow and sea
Photo: Ilan Kelman


Proposals were announced in mid-March for petroleum exploration in dozens of offshore Arctic sites. Public consultations follow before finalising the plans for applications later this year.

Environmentalists immediately condemned all northern drilling. Arctic petroleum risks are not fully understood. An under-ice spill or a tanker sinking in a storm would be environmentally catastrophic with huge clean-up challenges.

Meanwhile, Norway leads efforts to tackle climate change. It seems hypocritical to support others in adjusting to a changing climate while extracting and selling fossil fuels which cause the problem.

These represent big-picture, global perspectives. What about local views from those directly affected?

As always, communities are diverse. In Northern Norway, 'directly affected' tends to mean that revenues and jobs flow in. Hammerfest residents are often positive about the petroleum industry because they experience these impacts.

A major catastrophe or slow degradation could change local perspectives. But not always. Around the Barents, social and environmental damage are sometimes accepted as the cost of doing oil and gas business.

And sometimes not. Many locals are as furious as external commentators at the prospects for continued reliance on the fossil fuel economy. They offer alternative entrepreneurship to keep communities thriving.

The debate continues. Tell the government your thoughts!

Ilan Kelman is a Reader in Risk, Resilience and Global Health at University College London.



Published on Friday, 31st March, 2017 at 17:35 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

This post has the following tags: oil, barentssea, climate, energy, arctic, globalwarming, co2, greenhousegases, paywall.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!