Oil realism in the Arctic / Columns / The Foreigner

Oil realism in the Arctic. The Arctic: The Last Frontier. For whom? People have lived there for millennia. The frontier ethos unsurprisingly pervaded the Arctic Frontiers conference in Tromsø from 24-29 January. Held annually since 2007, just after the sun re-appears, the meeting brings together industry, policy makers, and scientists to discuss the Arctic. It is an intensive week with an international participant list. Whether you are a student or invited keynote, exciting opportunities abound for policy, business, science, and cultural exchange.

oil, arctic, kroner, environment, climate, paywall



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Oil realism in the Arctic

Published on Wednesday, 10th February, 2016 at 08:35 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

The Arctic: The Last Frontier. For whom? People have lived there for millennia.

The view from Tromsø
The view from Tromsø
Photo: Ilan Kelman


The frontier ethos unsurprisingly pervaded the Arctic Frontiers conference in Tromsø from 24-29 January. Held annually since 2007, just after the sun re-appears, the meeting brings together industry, policy makers, and scientists to discuss the Arctic.

It is an intensive week with an international participant list. Whether you are a student or invited keynote, exciting opportunities abound for policy, business, science, and cultural exchange.

Politicians, including Prime Minister Erna Solberg, and industry leaders, including several CEOs, gave speeches. Not coincidentally, oil and gas were still very much the top buzzwords at these high-level sessions.

Moving away from the crowded plenaries, realism prevailed. In the side events and breakout groups, the green shift and kroner beyond oil were explored in-depth, not as flashy phrases from elected and business leaders.

Climate change, barely worth a passing glance in the high-level desperate rush for Arctic petroleum, became significant in the serious discussions. Away from the media glare and security zone, the voices of indigenous and non-indigenous Arctic peoples were not just heard, but also listened to.

In terms of what the Arctic is and could be, political and business leaders remain far behind Arctic peoples and scientists. Arctic Frontiers provides a single venue for bringing together disparate views. If only the prominent participants would attend the smaller sessions.

Ilan Kelman is a Reader in Risk, Resilience and Global Health at University College London.



Published on Wednesday, 10th February, 2016 at 08:35 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

This post has the following tags: oil, arctic, kroner, environment, climate, paywall.





  
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