To travel, or not to travel / Columns / The Foreigner

To travel, or not to travel. I apologise that I fly too much. The energy cost is excessive and the price of tickets is far too low in comparison to the environmental consequences. That makes it tempting to flit over to another location, simply because--as with any major city in Norway--it is a 1-2-hour air hop compared to a long and expensive trip via land or water.      In actual fact, I prefer not to travel. I would much rather be working extensively in my local community and to enjoy what it offers, while making my research applicable to my local context.

co2, climate, travel, melting, globalwarming



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



Columns Article

LATEST:

To travel, or not to travel

Published on Saturday, 1st November, 2014 at 12:25 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

I apologise that I fly too much. The energy cost is excessive and the price of tickets is far too low in comparison to the environmental consequences.

In flight mode
Not flying is good for the climate, flying satisfies the need for open-mindedness, stimulus, and new experiences.In flight mode
Photo: Ilan Kelman


That makes it tempting to flit over to another location, simply because--as with any major city in Norway--it is a 1-2-hour air hop compared to a long and expensive trip via land or water.     

In actual fact, I prefer not to travel. I would much rather be working extensively in my local community and to enjoy what it offers, while making my research applicable to my local context.

That would be much more sustainable, from an environmental perspective as well as from a personal sanity perspective. Unfortunately, the funders of my research, fairly and legitimately, expect their money to be used for fieldwork, intensive face-to-face project meetings, and international scientific dissemination such as conferences.

All that jet-setting indeed improves the science while fostering creativity and collaboration. The travel and accompanying experiences are a humbling a privilege.

I gain immensely from it. Meeting people face-to-face to focus on our tasks is fun and productive, as is seeing new places for myself.

But I nonetheless always prefer to use some of my research money and time to support the local economy for local endeavours leading to local gains. Ultimately, it is a balance.

Not travelling neglects the need for open-mindedness, stimulus, and new experiences. Too much travel becomes an irritating and wasteful burden.

Each person will find their own balance. We must always remember how much our home can offer which itself provides open-mindedness, stimulus, and new experiences.

Ilan Kelman is a Reader in Risk, Resilience and Global Health at University College London. He is trying to avoid reaching Gold status with various airlines.



Published on Saturday, 1st November, 2014 at 12:25 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

This post has the following tags: co2, climate, travel, melting, globalwarming.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!