What about science diplomacy? / Columns / The Foreigner

What about science diplomacy?. Norway leads, and has long led, the world in many areas of science and diplomacy. Science diplomacy is diplomacy enacted by scientists or for scientific endeavours such as research projects, publications, and conferences. Scientists might or might not be active and formal diplomats. England's Edward Jenner became so revered for introducing the smallpox vaccine in 1796 that he later mediated France-England prisoner exchanges. Henry Kissinger and Condoleezza Rice were professors before becoming US Secretary of State.

arctic, antarctic, science, diplomacy, research, paywall



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What about science diplomacy?

Published on Monday, 30th January, 2017 at 15:35 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

Norway leads, and has long led, the world in many areas of science and diplomacy.

Nobel Peace Centre, Oslo
Nobel Peace Centre, Oslo
Photo: Ilan Kelman


Science diplomacy is diplomacy enacted by scientists or for scientific endeavours such as research projects, publications, and conferences. Scientists might or might not be active and formal diplomats.

England's Edward Jenner became so revered for introducing the smallpox vaccine in 1796 that he later mediated France-England prisoner exchanges. Henry Kissinger and Condoleezza Rice were professors before becoming US Secretary of State.

The Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs deliberately use science for the diplomatic end of eliminating weapons of mass destruction including nuclear weapons. Pugwash won the 1995 Nobel Peace Prize, sharing it with Pugwash's co-founder Joseph Rotblat.

Other scientists who are Nobel Peace Prize laureates include Linus Pauling and Andrei Sakharov. Irène Joliot-Curie and Frédéric Joliot jointly won the 1935 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and were anti-fascist advocates.

Polar regions are science diplomacy icons. Norway is an original signatory to the 1959 Antarctic Treaty stating "Antarctica shall continue forever to be used exclusively for peaceful purposes". At the other pole, the unique Svalbard Treaty has led to scientists collaborating internationally on Arctic topics.

Few recent polar activities have led to diplomacy beyond science, perhaps because the scientists have not aimed to be diplomats. It remains to be seen how much science itself, not just the people involved, can influence international peace and conflict.

Ilan Kelman is a Reader in Risk, Resilience and Global Health at University College London.




Published on Monday, 30th January, 2017 at 15:35 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

This post has the following tags: arctic, antarctic, science, diplomacy, research, paywall.





  
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