Arctic Circle film event rolls / Entertainment / The Foreigner

Arctic Circle film event rolls. Norway’s smallest cinematic festival kicks off this week, with 62 films available for viewers at the edge of the world. 6,000 visitors are expected to visit the annual Nordkapp Film Festival, which will be showing a wide variety of titles including Amy, French-Mauritian Timbuktu, Sinister 2 (horror), and film collection 7 Sámi Stories – which “takes you on a journey deep into the heart of Sápmi” with telling hitherto unrevealed stories, the blurb states. This year’s festival is opened by Joseph Culp, who became a familiar face in Honningsvåg after participating in Knut Erik Jensen’s films, the founder of the festival.

nordkapp, finnmark, wwii



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Arctic Circle film event rolls

Published on Monday, 7th September, 2015 at 13:56 under the entertainment category, by Tove Andersson.

Norway’s smallest cinematic festival kicks off this week, with 62 films available for viewers at the edge of the world.

Nordkapp around Midnight
Nordkapp around Midnight
Photo: gek_at2000/Flickr


6,000 visitors are expected to visit the annual Nordkapp Film Festival, which will be showing a wide variety of titles including Amy, French-Mauritian Timbuktu, Sinister 2 (horror), and film collection 7 Sámi Stories – which “takes you on a journey deep into the heart of Sápmi” with telling hitherto unrevealed stories, the blurb states.

This year’s festival is opened by Joseph Culp, who became a familiar face in Honningsvåg after participating in Knut Erik Jensen’s films, the founder of the festival.

But what is perhaps more interesting is the filmmaker’s history. 2015 marks 75 years since Nazi Germany invaded Norway, as well as the 70th anniversary of Norway’s liberation by the Russian Army – which saw retreating German soldiers carry out their scorched earth policy, burning houses in the area.

Knut Erik Jensen was evacuated from Honningsvåg to Senja, an island located along the Troms County coastline, Aged 4, he and his 2, 7, and 14-year old siblings’ future were German barracks there.

An award-winning filmmaker, Mr Jensen is considered to be one of the most important documentary directors in Norway between 1970 and now. He has moved back to Finnmark County, aged 74, having attended the London International Film School in the 70s.

Having also made Burnt by Frost (1997), a film about Finnmark’s strategically important significance for the power struggle between superpowers the US and then USSR, he has planned another.

According to the description, Longing for Today “is the only feature film to depict the reconstruction of the northern Norway region of Finnmark after the Second World War. He views the history as being too important not to be told.

“It’s by chance that I’m both now the only living time witness in Norway who has experienced [Nazi Germany’s] ‘total war’ in Finnmark and ‘accidentally’ a filmmaker,” he said.

Co-producer Anna Björk compares the little boy of 4 who fled with his mother, with today’s refugees.

“Norway's population would perhaps have had greater understanding of what it really means to be a refugee and lose everything if it had been aware of its own history and had knowledge insight into what happened in Finnmark and North Troms in 1944,” remarked Knut Erik Jensen.

Today, Nordkapp, originally called Knyskanes, is a major tourist destination with its own tourist centre. Over 200,000 tourists visit the plateau there every year.

Moreover, Hurtigruten arrives twice a day, and the red carpet will be rolled out for the festival.

“One can’t get further north on the European continent [than Nordkapp]”, explains film festival founder Mr Jensen, “so the themes of primary industries such as aquaculture and agriculture and the Arctic communities are highly topical here.”

“We’re at the centre of the world's northernmost issues, right in the international discussion. Our story is about refugees, the Cold War and its relationship to NATO,” he told regional publication Finnmark Dagblad.

The Nordkapp Film Festival runs between 9th and 13th September.



Published on Monday, 7th September, 2015 at 13:56 under the entertainment category, by Tove Andersson.

This post has the following tags: nordkapp, finnmark, wwii.





  
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