Food, glorious food, but don’t forget the wine / Entertainment / The Foreigner

Food, glorious food, but don’t forget the wine. Gladmat is Stavanger’s annual gathering for foodies. With its four days of food-filled festivities, there will almost certainly be something you can find to tickle your taste-buds with. As no meal would be complete in its culinary experience without it, wine will also be served for those partial to a tipple. Literally translated, “gladmat” means “happy food”, but maybe “fab food” would be more fitting? That is Heidi Netland Berge, the festival’s general manager’s intention anyway. “It’s a national celebration where everything we do focuses on food. There is a good atmosphere, and food is presented in a positive way” she tells The Foreigner.New this year

rogaland, gladmat, festival, food, drink, wine



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



Entertainment Article

LATEST:

Food, glorious food, but don’t forget the wine

Published on Friday, 3rd July, 2009 at 17:30 under the entertainment category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 7th July 2009 at 22:07.

Gladmat is Stavanger’s annual gathering for foodies. With its four days of food-filled festivities, there will almost certainly be something you can find to tickle your taste-buds with. As no meal would be complete in its culinary experience without it, wine will also be served for those partial to a tipple.

Wine glasses from the Gladmat festival
Wine glasses from the Gladmat festival
Photo: Tom Haga/Gladmat


What’s it all about?

Literally translated, “gladmat” means “happy food”, but maybe “fab food” would be more fitting? That is Heidi Netland Berge, the festival’s general manager’s intention anyway.

“It’s a national celebration where everything we do focuses on food. There is a good atmosphere, and food is presented in a positive way” she tells The Foreigner.

New this year

This year’s event will be Berge’s third. The festival has been criticised for having too many stands in the past. With even more this year, and a festival that has become a tradition, without the activities becoming stuck in them, the challenges that await her are considerable. What does she feel that she can bring to the festival and what is going to be new this year?

“Apart from the main concept being a tent in Vågen, my job is to pick the good parts, build on them, and work with the same competent people who were here before I came along. Although we have always had activities for children, this year, we are focusing particularly on young people. Amongst other things, there will be a restaurant run by them in Konsgård School in aid of cancer care. The same people have been on a food-making course at our own Gladmat School last winter.”

The history

According to Berge, the festival was started approximately 12 years ago by several people, who joined forces to show what Rogaland – known as the food county – had to offer of locally-produced specialities.

“Rogaland is one of the regions where most food is produced. It has agriculture, aquaculture, and fishing, together with very many good quality vegetables, especially tomatoes from Finnøy (one of the islands) and Jæren” she says.

But since then, Gladmat has expanded, and now welcomes participants from all over the world.

The contributors

Although everyone who grows, delivers, or prepares food is welcome, from the small producer right up to industry-sized outfits, they have to apply to be part of the festival. However, the process doesn’t end there.

“It’s important to verify the quality of those who are going to participate. In order to qualify, they have to both present the concept, and tell us what type of food they are going to offer” she says.

Winers, diners, and cuisinier(e)s

“Our target audience is everybody. Many come from Norway, including those who have moved out of town and who visit it for the festival. We also have people who travel from Europe and the USA” Berge says.

It’s always nice to know that anyone is welcome but maybe the type of food that the paying public can expect is more interesting; that’s the whole purpose of the festival, after all.

As well as specialities from the Norwegian kitchen, with particular focus on seafood this year, there will be tastings and meals on offer from such countries as India, Vietnam, Russia, Brazil, and Greece. For those who are either used to them, or for those who wish to be more adventurous, both frog’s legs and snails will also be on offer from the people living on the other side of La Manche.

More than enough to choose from and feed everybody, it seems.

Gladmat runs between 22 and 25 July.



Published on Friday, 3rd July, 2009 at 17:30 under the entertainment category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 7th July 2009 at 22:07.

This post has the following tags: rogaland, gladmat, festival, food, drink, wine.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!