Nordic mythology on display in Oslo / Entertainment / The Foreigner

Nordic mythology on display in Oslo. Finnish and Norwegian artists’ works are on show in the Norwegian capital in a meeting between international symbolism and heritage. Exhibition The Magic North: Finnish and Norwegian art around 1900 at the National Gallery features 19th Century fin-de-siècle highlights from both the Finnish National Gallery Ateneum’s and the National Museum’s collections. It focuses on themes including mythology, existential vulnerability, national identity, and unspoilt nature.

art, norway, finland, exhibition, oslo



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Nordic mythology on display in Oslo

Published on Monday, 26th January, 2015 at 14:18 under the entertainment category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 27th January 2015 at 09:24.

Finnish and Norwegian artists’ works are on show in the Norwegian capital in a meeting between international symbolism and heritage.

'Melancholy' by Edvard Munch
Munch painted multiple versions of the expressionist work in oil on canvas during 1891–93'Melancholy' by Edvard Munch
Photo: © Nasjonalmuseet/Jacques Lathion


Exhibition The Magic North: Finnish and Norwegian art around 1900 at the National Gallery features 19th Century fin-de-siècle highlights from both the Finnish National Gallery Ateneum’s and the National Museum’s collections.

It focuses on themes including mythology, existential vulnerability, national identity, and unspoilt nature.

Highlighting similarities between Finnish and Norwegian within the fabric of European symbolism, the political and cultural-historical similarities between Finland and Norway make the juxtaposition of both countries’ art from that period interesting, National Gallery staff says.

According to the institution, symbolism also heavily influenced Finnish and Norwegian art of the period.

This helped initiate a dialogue between the respective national heritages and the international ideas of that movement.

Moreover, both countries’ location on the outskirts of Europe meant that cities including Berlin, Dusseldorf, Munich, and Paris became significant places for Finnish and Norwegian artists of that period to meet.

Neither Norway nor Finland had their own art academies or many places to exhibit art in the 1800s.

An example of significant events and meeting places was when Norway’s Edvard Munch (1863-1944) and Finland’s Swedish-speaking Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931) held exhibitions in the same place and year.

This was in 1895, some 10 and 22 years before Norway then Finland became independent nations.

Gallen-Kallela was also friend of Norwegian painter Carl Dørnberger (1864-1940). Interest and curiosity for works by Munch, painter Gerhard Munthe (1849-1929), sculptor Gustav Vigeland (1869-1943), playwright Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906), and author Knut Hamsun (1859-1952) were expressed from the Finnish side.

Moreover, artists also returned home with the ideas and concepts of European symbolism.

Both Finnish and Norwegian artists quested after distinctly national elements of landscapes and folklore of their respective countries, explains the Norwegian National Gallery.

Journeys were made to regions such as Karelia (Finland) and Telemark in Norway so they could come into contact with primeval Finnish and Norwegian culture, which they found there – Finland’s Akseli Gallen-Kallela and composer Jean Sibelius (1865-1957), who composed the Karelia Suite (Op. 11), were friends.

“It is a unique event that we are allowed to borrow so many highlights from this period in Finnish art history from Ateneum," says Vibeke Waallann Hansen, curator at Oslo’s National Gallery in a statement.

As well works by Akselid Gallen-Kallela, Edvard Munch, Gerhard Munthe and Gustav Vigeland, other artists represented include Finland’s Helene Schjerfbeck (1862-1946), Magnus Enckell (1870-1925), and Hugo Simberg (1873-1917 – sculptor).

Harald Sohlberg (1869-1935), Christian Skredsvig (1854-1924), and Theodor Kittelsen (1857-194) are some of the Norwegian artists whose works will be on display.

"We hope the exhibition will give the public a fresh experience, and that it can illuminate parallels between Norwegian and Finnish visual art,” says Susanna Pettersson, director at Ateneum.

The Magic North: Finnish and Norwegian Art around 1900 runs from 30th January to 16th May 2015.



Published on Monday, 26th January, 2015 at 14:18 under the entertainment category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 27th January 2015 at 09:24.

This post has the following tags: art, norway, finland, exhibition, oslo.





  
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