Norwegian and Iraqi artists collaborate in Britain / Entertainment / The Foreigner

Norwegian and Iraqi artists collaborate in Britain. The art exhibition is currently being showcased at the Kristin Hjellegjerde gallery in South West London. ‘Disclosing the Uncanny’ displays the works of Norwegian textile artist Hanne Friis and Belgium-based Iraqi sculptor Athar. Their exhibition shows a grotesque manipulation of the human body and the way it is present when it is absent.  Friis’s organ-like shapes cascade down the walls to create organic shapes that pulse with human life. Athar’s white marble sculpture heads resemble classical busts, but which have suffered noses broken, eyes gouged out, and parts blown to oblivion.

art, exhibitions, london, galleries, paywall



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Norwegian and Iraqi artists collaborate in Britain

Published on Friday, 21st April, 2017 at 12:57 under the entertainment category, by Charlotte Bryan.

The art exhibition is currently being showcased at the Kristin Hjellegjerde gallery in South West London.

Marble Head Opus 5 nr6 2015
One of Athar’s white marble sculpture heads.Marble Head Opus 5 nr6 2015
Photo: Kristin Hjellegjerde Gallery


‘Disclosing the Uncanny’ displays the works of Norwegian textile artist Hanne Friis and Belgium-based Iraqi sculptor Athar. Their exhibition shows a grotesque manipulation of the human body and the way it is present when it is absent. 

Friis’s organ-like shapes cascade down the walls to create organic shapes that pulse with human life. Athar’s white marble sculpture heads resemble classical busts, but which have suffered noses broken, eyes gouged out, and parts blown to oblivion.

The exhibition asks visitors to enter a strange room of bodies and observe fragility and visceral workings of the human body.

Oslo based textile sculptor Hanne Friis (b. 1972) refers to herself as the “Baroque minimalist”. Her works explore seeming contradictions such as order and chaos, beauty and grotesque, natural and artificial or inside and outside.

By foraging natural materials from Norway’s landscape such as lichen, birch, mushrooms, pinecones and many others, Friis extracts pigments and hand dyes textiles to create a new treatment of raw materials.

Friis told the Kristen Hjellegjerde gallery that “I find it interesting to combine the intimate with the large-scale. I am interested in the body’s vulnerability and human mortality, but also the power and violence of life.”

Other works from Friis include Soft Monuments, KODE Art Museum, Bergen (2015), We live upon a Star, Henie Onstad Art Center (2014), Attention: Craft!, Liljevalchs Konsthall, Stockholm (2014), Thousands Threads, Lillehammer Art Museum (2013), and The Norwegian Sculpture Biennial, The Vigeland Museum, Oslo (2013).

Athar (b. 1982) from Iraq moved to various places throughout his youth including Rome, the Netherlands, Florence and Antwerp. His influences transcend geographical borders and works aim to find the common ground in the human experience. Images of suffering and violence that stem from his cultural heritage and experience of the Gulf War have shaped Athar’s ability to showcase the common experiences of human life.

Recent works of his exhibitions include Works at Galerie Löhrl, Monchengladbach, Germany (2016), The Columbia Threadneedle Prize, Mall Galleries, London (2016), and Where Pain Becomes Beauty, Palazzo Medici-Riccardi, Florence (2015).

First established in 2012, the Kristin Hjellegjerede Gallery promotes innovative international works in the contemporary art world.

It was also named one of Blouin’s 500 Best Galleries in both 2015 and 2016, as well as The Londonist’s Independent Gallery of the Year in 2014.

Disclosing the Uncanny runs until 29th April.



Published on Friday, 21st April, 2017 at 12:57 under the entertainment category, by Charlotte Bryan.

This post has the following tags: art, exhibitions, london, galleries, paywall.





  
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