Norwegian Conceptual Art revisited / Entertainment / The Foreigner

Norwegian Conceptual Art revisited. Oslo’s National Museum offers a unique exhibition that sheds some new light both on the genre’s history in Norway and its artists. A concept is an idea or thought, so the term ‘Conceptual Art’ literally means ‘idea art’, or ‘art of the ideas’. Conceptual Art spans the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s. A basis-shaking movement, it challenged the conception of art, its processes, theories and conventions. It was an international movement across Europe, North America and South America. Norway was missing in this artistic revolution, however.  

art, oslo, exhibitions, paywall



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Norwegian Conceptual Art revisited

Published on Friday, 26th February, 2016 at 14:36 under the entertainment category, by Clara Reig Palau.

Oslo’s National Museum offers a unique exhibition that sheds some new light both on the genre’s history in Norway and its artists.

'Breathing Balloon'
Inghild Karlsen is one of the artists whose work is on display at the exhibition.'Breathing Balloon'
Photo: Inghild Karlsen/©All rights reserved


A concept is an idea or thought, so the term ‘Conceptual Art’ literally means ‘idea art’, or ‘art of the ideas’.

Conceptual Art spans the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s. A basis-shaking movement, it challenged the conception of art, its processes, theories and conventions. It was an international movement across Europe, North America and South America. Norway was missing in this artistic revolution, however.  

The National Museum’s Exhibition, ‘Silent Revolt’ revisits masterpieces by Norwegian artists who struggled to have a place and recognition in their country’s art scene, while inherently questioning their underestimation during the 1970s and 1980s.

These two decades saw all of them attempt to expand and challenge Norway’s isolated and conservative art scene. However, most were ignored, and were not given opportunities to exhibit their works in galleries or museums.

Conformity coming from the majority of art critics of that time became the rule, with these emerging insurrectional artists and their pieces being catalogued under the tag of: “Debris art”. Nonetheless, Conceptual Art did represent asignificant turning point in Norway’s art history, introducing revolutionary ideas and techniques. Their distribution through magazines, such as Studio International or Avalanche, played a key role in spreading the art revolution’s ideals and innovations. 

The ‘Silent Revolt’ exhibition displays up to 50 works from photographs and video creations to large sculptural works. Many have never been shown to the general public before.

Visitors can find pieces by sculptor Bård Breivik, who passed away on 10th January this year, and a reconstruction of his installation of mouldy bread created on 1974. This was when he first debuted after a one-year stay in London studying at the Central Saint Matins College of Art and Design from 1970 to 1971.

Breivik, who started experimenting with Land Art, became one of the most influential artists in Norway, and the model of the Conceptual Art movement in the country. He led a gradual transformation of art education in Norway, and was appointed to the post of Sculpture Professor at the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm, which he held between 1982 and 1985. He also created the trophy for the 1996 Eurovision Song Contest, held in Oslo that year.

The ‘Silent Revolt’ exhibition also displays works by one of Norway’s most international Norwegian artists, Marianne Heske (b. 1946), who traveled worldwide, mostly exhibiting mostly her ready-mades – common objects reconsidered and designed to become art. This was first coined by Marcel Duchamp back in the early 1920s with his most famous piece: a porcelain urinal entitled Fountain. Marianne Heske’s With and About People depicts people as they hold a doll’s head.

In the photographic work, now exhibited for the first time, the one hundred photographs are shown as slides in a projector accompanied by a soundtrack of a multitude of voices. The pictures show how the doll’s head is transformed, creating different connotations based on the context.

Other artists’ works present in ‘Silent Revolt’ are Paul Brand, Gerd Tinglum, Viggo Andersen, Bente Stokke, Inghild Karlsen, Lars Paalgard, Oddvar I.N. Daren, Audun Sørsdal, Terje Munthe, Carina Hedén, and Ingerid Book. All were born between 1941 and 1955.

There will also be a session of three seminars and an artist talk between two young Norwegian artists, who will be discussing the impact of Conceptual Art on their present work.

‘Silent Revolt: Norwegian Process Art and Conceptual Art in the 1970s and 80s’ is on show between 4th of March and 18th of September 2016.



Published on Friday, 26th February, 2016 at 14:36 under the entertainment category, by Clara Reig Palau.

This post has the following tags: art, oslo, exhibitions, paywall.





  
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