The Norwegian coffee soul: From black cup to cortado / Entertainment / The Foreigner

The Norwegian coffee soul: From black cup to cortado. BOOK REVIEW: One fun fact you need to know about Norway is how much the locals love their caffeine. Company Norsk Kaffeinformasjon (Norwegian Coffee Information) recently arranged the Norwegian championship in "Slappa" (Relaxing) in Oslo for the 8th time.  A book searching for Norwegians’ coffee soul, Den norske kaffesjela is just out. Each person over 15 drinks an average of four cups of coffee a day. Famous Norwegian writer Anne B. Ragde writes in the introduction to the book by journalist and coffee enthusiast Egon Holstad that “I have been drinking coffee for almost my entire life.”

coffee, norwegians, caffeine, medicine



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The Norwegian coffee soul: From black cup to cortado

Published on Sunday, 14th December, 2014 at 09:50 under the entertainment category, by Tove Andersson.
Last Updated on 14th December 2014 at 10:12.

BOOK REVIEW: One fun fact you need to know about Norway is how much the locals love their caffeine.

Coffee beans
Norwegians drink litres (gallons) of coffee each year.Coffee beans
Photo: m thierry/Flickr


Company Norsk Kaffeinformasjon (Norwegian Coffee Information) recently arranged the Norwegian championship in "Slappa" (Relaxing) in Oslo for the 8th time.  A book searching for Norwegians’ coffee soul, Den norske kaffesjela is just out.

Each person over 15 drinks an average of four cups of coffee a day. Famous Norwegian writer Anne B. Ragde writes in the introduction to the book by journalist and coffee enthusiast Egon Holstad that “I have been drinking coffee for almost my entire life.”

“It began with the fragrance. Mom always sipped a cup of coffee while she breastfed me in the morning. […] That's probably why I have always preferred coffee with a dash of milk.”

Is it good for you?

Book cover 'Den norske kaffesjela'
Book cover 'Den norske kaffesjela'
Tigerforlaget
Holstad’s book cannot be called a coffee table book. It is not oversized and contains many facts and lots of fun. There is a lot of information, many pictures, inspiration, recipes, and stories about people with special coffee traditions: Church coffee, Fairtrade coffee, coffee poetry, coffee history – the book covers a lot.

The Nordic countries dominate the rankings for annual coffee consumption and studies on the health effects of coffee. Only Finns are thirstier than Norwegians. Coffee figures from Statistics Norway (SSB) show that Norway imported 0.5 percent of all coffee produced in the world last year. Norwegians comprise just 0.07 per cent of the world population.

A picture on page 155 of the book shows a very young former Minister, Thorvald Stoltenberg, father of Secretary General of NATO Jens Stoltenberg. Mr Stoltenberg Sr. is listening to the radio with a cup of the Norwegians favorite drink, coffee, in his hand.

Results of a study published in a 2009 issue of Human Brain Mapping support drinking coffee, suggesting that consuming an average of 950 milligrams of caffeine daily reduced cerebral blood flow by about 27 percent. This means that coffee potentially impairs blood circulation in our brain, lowering the risks of stroke. Oslo University Hospital researchers also found that coffee (and cigarettes) may protect against liver disease.

Christmas in your cup?

Den norske kaffesjela author Egon Holstad also tells us about the story behind the Norwegian Christmas tree in London’s Trafalgar Square. On June 7 1940, Norwegian King Haakon, Prime Minister Johan Nygaardsvold and his government were in exile in London. The Christmas tree in London has symbolized Norway’s gratitude since 1947 for sheltering during WWII.

Relaxation
Relaxation
Ⅿeagan
In the book, a black and white picture shows men out in the woods with a thermos drinking what is captioned with “a well-deserved cup of coffee must be consumed after the 1955 Christmas tree is felled and ready to be sent to London” (p 45).

Holstad has interviewed coffee producers to fishermen, midwives, and a champion 2004 in cupping (coffee tasting), Tim Wendelboe, whose website is in English. We Norwegians love it; that we are the best in the world, almost no matter what it is," writes Holstad. Is this where he has found the Norwegian soul, perhaps? At least, what the so-called “king of coffee”, coffee manufacturing company chairman, and former Bergen Mayor Herman Friele says is “you cannot argue over a cup of coffee."

One can argue, on the other hand, that the new generation of coffee drinkers does not buy Fairtrade, according to Ulf Stensland in company Löfberg. And if anyone wonders how the championship in "Slappa" went, a nurse measured the resting pulse of winner Cathrine Hoelstad from eastern Norway’s Nesodden. Her resting heartrate was 49 after a cup. 

Facts about coffee and Norwegians:

  • Norway imports 40,000 tons of coffee annually, almost 9.5 kg per capita.
  • Norway imported 0.5 percent of all coffee produced in the world in 2010.
  • 53 percent of roasted coffee is imported from Sweden.

(Source: SSB)

Den norske kaffesjela (ISBN/EAN: 9788299964128) – in Norwegian only – is published by Tigerforlaget, and costs NOK 349.



Published on Sunday, 14th December, 2014 at 09:50 under the entertainment category, by Tove Andersson.
Last updated on 14th December 2014 at 10:12.

This post has the following tags: coffee, norwegians, caffeine, medicine.





  
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