Emergency hotline has history of problems / News in brief / The Foreigner

Emergency hotline has history of problems. NEWS IN BRIEF: Norway’s emergency hotline has risked collapse for years, a terrorism exercise in 2006 revealed. Evaluation reports seen by NRK show issues were found showing Norway was not fully prepared for an attack, and that major incidents could cause the service to collapse. It was recently revealed that Oslo is the only place where more than five calls to 112 could handle more than five calls at once.

norwayemergencyservices, oslobombing, utoeyashootings, andersbehringbreivik



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News in brief Article

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Emergency hotline has history of problems

Published on Thursday, 8th September, 2011 at 12:18 under the news in brief category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

NEWS IN BRIEF: Norway’s emergency hotline has risked collapse for years, a terrorism exercise in 2006 revealed.

Norwegian police car in Trondheim
Norwegian police car in Trondheim
Photo: HuBar/Wikimedia Commons


Evaluation reports seen by NRK show issues were found showing Norway was not fully prepared for an attack, and that major incidents could cause the service to collapse.

It was recently revealed that Oslo is the only place where more than five calls to 112 could handle more than five calls at once.

Emergency services also experienced major communications issues during Anders Behring Breivik’s attacks on Utøya. Police had to use unsecured analogue lines, emails, and faxes from the island, and ambulance personnel reported major gaps in emergency service network coverage.

Oslo Police admit many specially trained police never received orders to report for duty after the bombing because of warning system failures. It is alleged very little has been done to improve communications problems since these were first identified during the 2006 anti-terror exercise.

The Directorate for Civil Protection and Emergency Planning (DSB) subsequently handed ministers a report, stating the government must look at systems currently in place.

According to the Ministry of Justice, there are now ongoing discussions about having a common number for all emergency services.




Published on Thursday, 8th September, 2011 at 12:18 under the news in brief category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: norwayemergencyservices, oslobombing, utoeyashootings, andersbehringbreivik.





  
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