-42.4 Celsius not Norway coldest / News / The Foreigner

-42.4 Celsius not Norway coldest. This week’s chilly -44.32 Fahrenheit temperature in Finnmark County’s Kautokeino municipality is by no means a record. Northern Norway’s Karasjok (Kárášjoga in Northern Sami) municipality in the same county is some 16 kilometres (10 miles) west of the border with Finland. It has approximately 2,700 inhabitants, of which 80 to 90 per cent are Sami (Sámi). 40 per cent have Sami as their mother tongue. As well as boasting a rich cultural heritage, Karasjok is the current record holder when it comes to Norway’s coldest place. 1st January 1886 saw the temperature reach down to -51.4 °C (about -60.52 °F).

cold, winter, sami, celsius, fahrenheit, temperatures, freezing, snow, glaciers, skiing, paywall



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-42.4 Celsius not Norway coldest

Published on Thursday, 5th January, 2017 at 16:39 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 5th January 2017 at 17:43.

This week’s chilly -44.32 Fahrenheit temperature in Finnmark County’s Kautokeino municipality is by no means a record.

Outside thermometer
19th Century Norway was inhospitable.Outside thermometer
Photo: martin_vmorris/Flickr


Northern Norway’s Karasjok (Kárášjoga in Northern Sami) municipality in the same county is some 16 kilometres (10 miles) west of the border with Finland. It has approximately 2,700 inhabitants, of which 80 to 90 per cent are Sami (Sámi). 40 per cent have Sami as their mother tongue.

As well as boasting a rich cultural heritage, Karasjok is the current record holder when it comes to Norway’s coldest place. 1st January 1886 saw the temperature reach down to -51.4 °C (about -60.52 °F).

Today, Thursday 5th January is no exception. While Røros, a former mining town in Sør-Trøndelag County that has been on UNESCO’s World Heritage List since 1980, often leads the cold temperature rankings at this time of year (-24 °C (-11.2 °F)), Karasjok (Cuovddatmohkki) still led the freezing league tables early this morning with -36.2 °C (-33.16 °F).

Husky trip in Finnmark
Husky trip in Finnmark
martin_vmorris/Flickr
“January / February tends to be the coldest time up here,” Torgrim Fredeng Kemi, investment project leader for the municipality, tells The Foreigner by phone. “I remember it was minus 50 °C (-58 °F) at the end of January 1999; there were almost no cars in the streets. But then it got eight degrees milder and people came outside, enjoying the winter weather.”

Karasjok’s location means the cold air is dry, however, and it sees less wind than some other parts of Norway.

“Moreover, humid air near the coast often makes temperatures feel colder than they are in comparison to inland parts,” Lillian Kalve at Norway’s Met Office explains.

Norway is also a skiing country. While it is not possible to measure some parts with the deepest snow due to their inaccessibility for most of the year, there have been some records in others.

Grjotrusti, a mountain in western Norway’s Hordaland County, tops the weather station measurements table, with 5.85 metres (roughly 19 feet) recorded on 3rd April 1918.

Svartisen Glacier, northern Norway
Svartisen Glacier, northern Norway
Julian-G. Albert/Flickr
Staff from the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) has measured depths of over 12 metres (more than 39 feet) as well. This has been on northern Norway’s Svartisen Glaciers (Vestre and Østre Svartisen, respectively) and Ålfotbreen – a glacier in Sogn og Fjordane County, western Norway.

According to the Met Office’s Lillian Kalve, “most snow can be found in glacial areas such Hordaland’s Hardangerjøkulen and Sogn og Fjordane’s Jostedal Glaciers,” says Ms Kalve.

With an area of 487 square kilometres (some 188 square miles), Jostedalsbreen in western Norway is Continental Europe’s largest glacier. Its highest point is Høgste Breakulen, located in the Jostedalsbreen National Park, at 1,957 metres above mean sea level (MSL) – roughly 6,420 feet.

(Additional source: Wikipedia)




Published on Thursday, 5th January, 2017 at 16:39 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 5th January 2017 at 17:43.

This post has the following tags: cold, winter, sami, celsius, fahrenheit, temperatures, freezing, snow, glaciers, skiing, paywall.





  
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