33 per cent of inmates foreigners / News / The Foreigner

33 per cent of inmates foreigners. UPDATED: Some 3 out of 10 of people serving time in Norwegian prisons come from another country, a new overview shows. Most of the foreigners, comprising 155 out of 3,842 inmates, total, come from Poland (figures as of 20th August 2014). Poles are presently the largest group of immigrants in Norway. Lithuania and Romania are the next two countries with a higher ratio of inmates than other ones. These numbers are 131 and 128, respectively.

crime, jail, norway, foreigners, norwegians



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33 per cent of inmates foreigners

Published on Monday, 6th October, 2014 at 10:53 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 16th October 2014 at 14:00.

UPDATED: Some 3 out of 10 of people serving time in Norwegian prisons come from another country, a new overview shows.

Oslo Prison, exterior
Roughly 67 per cent of inmates in Norway's jails are Norwegian nationals. The rest are foreign nationals. The picture is from 2010.Oslo Prison, exterior
Photo: Inez Dawczyk/The Foreigner


Most of the foreigners, comprising 155 out of 3,842 inmates, total, come from Poland (figures as of 20th August 2014). Poles are presently the largest group of immigrants in Norway.

Lithuania and Romania are the next two countries with a higher ratio of inmates than other ones. These numbers are 131 and 128, respectively.

While Somalian nationals comprise 56 inmates, Sweden had as many as Iraq and Albania (47). Danes and Germans had 22 inmates apiece in jail.

Lower down on the number of inmates scale come countries such as Latvia, Spain, and Turkey – with 11, 10, and 10, respectively.

Several countries had one inmate in jail, such as Switzerland, Cameroon, Greece, Israel, and Kenya. There were no convicts from 20 countries. These include Australia, Austria Kuwait, the Philippines, Uganda, and the Ukraine.   

There were 1,268 foreigners (including 10 classified as ‘stateless’) and 2,574 Norwegian nationals in jail as of 20th August this year, according to the compilation Norway broadcaster NRK made.

70 per cent of these foreign nationals have little or no connection to Norway - meaning no address, no work, and no family living here.

Of the total of 3,842 inmates, 452 were in jail for drugs offences, and 393 for what NRK groups together as lesser crimes such as robbery, counterfeiting, arson, and alcohol legislation breaches.

Figures for theft, violence, rape, and murder were 179, 97, 94, and 51, respectively.  

The statistics cover the years between 2004 and 2014. This is a period of time in which Norway’s total population increased from some 4.57 million (Q2 2004) to roughly 5.1 million (Q2 2014), according to Statistics Norway (SSB).

As of 1st January 2014, 14 per cent of Norway's total population was foreigners who have changed address and moved to the Scandinavian country.

SSB also says that 90,000 short-term workers came to Norway for less than six months in addition, though these did not immigrate.

NRK’s full list of foreign countries and foreign convicts can be found here (external link – in Norwegian).




Published on Monday, 6th October, 2014 at 10:53 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 16th October 2014 at 14:00.

This post has the following tags: crime, jail, norway, foreigners, norwegians.





  
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