A South Asia Nobel Peace Prize Concert / News / The Foreigner

A South Asia Nobel Peace Prize Concert. Pakistan’s Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Ustad Amjad Ali Khan from India will be performing to honour the Indian and Pakistani winners of this year’s Nobel Peace Prize. Amjad Ali Khan gave his first recital of the sarod – a lute like stringed instrument from India – at the young age of seven, and has not turned back since. He was born to the illustrious Bangash lineage rooted in the Senia Bangash School of music. Today, he is part of the sixth generation of inheritance in this legendary lineage.

nobelpeaceprize, oslo, childrennorway



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A South Asia Nobel Peace Prize Concert

Published on Thursday, 11th December, 2014 at 19:04 under the news category, by Manisha Choudhari.
Last Updated on 11th December 2014 at 19:29.

Pakistan’s Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Ustad Amjad Ali Khan from India will be performing to honour the Indian and Pakistani winners of this year’s Nobel Peace Prize.

Rahat Fateh Ali Khan
Indian and Pakistani musicians come together to play at the 2014 concert in honour of Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai.Rahat Fateh Ali Khan
Photo: Thomas Rome/Flickr


Amjad Ali Khan gave his first recital of the sarod – a lute like stringed instrument from India – at the young age of seven, and has not turned back since.

He was born to the illustrious Bangash lineage rooted in the Senia Bangash School of music. Today, he is part of the sixth generation of inheritance in this legendary lineage.

At the age of 69, Ali Khan is a highly regarded Sarod player, who has won many awards including the UNESCO Award, Padma Vibhushan (Second highest Indian civilian award), and UNICEF's National Ambassadorship.

He was also named broadcaster New Delhi Television Limited’s (NDTV) Indian of the Year in April this year.

Pakistani Rahat Fateh Ali Khan started his formal training in classical music and qawwali – a form of Sufi devotional music – at the age of seven with his uncle Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan.

Sufism is a concept in Islam defined by scholars as Islam’s inner, mystical dimension.

Eight years later, he became an important part of Nusrat’s qawwali group, which was famous internationally.

The Pakistani musician has performed at London’s Wembley Arena and the Manchester Arena. Ali Khan has also contributed to many Hollywood soundtracks, including that of Apocalypto.

Amjad Ali Khan (2000)
Amjad Ali Khan (2000)
Public Domain
Nobel Laureates Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai are, of course, the guests of honour at this prestigious event. They made poignant speeches at yesterday’s ceremony.

Both Satyarthi and Malala talked about how their respective countries had come together in this quest for children’s rights.

“I’m also glad that we can stand together and show the world that an Indian and a Pakistani can be united in peace and together work for children's rights, Malala said.

In his speech, Satyarthi was quick to point out that “a young and courageous Pakistani girl has met an Indian father and the Indian father met the Pakistani daughter” on the day of the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony.

The Laureates called upon everyone to come together and build a beautiful future for the children of the world.

“The award is not just for me, but those frightened children who want peace,” declared Malala.

“I refuse to accept that the temples of the world have no place for the dreams of our children. […] Today beyond the darkness I see the smile of children in blinking stars. […]  Put your hand to your heart, close your eyes, and feel the child inside you. Listen to that child,” Kailash Satyarthi said.

(Additional source: Wikipedia)



Published on Thursday, 11th December, 2014 at 19:04 under the news category, by Manisha Choudhari.
Last updated on 11th December 2014 at 19:29.

This post has the following tags: nobelpeaceprize, oslo, childrennorway.





  
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