Abattoirs receive cleaner cows / News / The Foreigner

Abattoirs receive cleaner cows. Farmers had their delivery-prices reduced on a total of 12,762 beef cattle in 2008 because they were too dirty. In 2007 it was higher. Norwegian farmers lost a total of seven million kroner last year, because they delivered cattle for slaughter that had too much dirt on them. One explanation for the reduction in numbers in comparison to 2007 could be that farmers have taken the problem seriously, and adopted measures that keep the animals cleaner. Increased focus The reasons for these measures are a result of the E-coli scandal of 2006. Six children, one of whom died, contracted a serious kidney infection from eating unhygienic meat. The Norwegian Food Authority was able to trace the meat back to dirty cattle.A no-win situation

cows, meat, dirty, e-coli, food, authority, norwegian



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Abattoirs receive cleaner cows

Published on Thursday, 5th March, 2009 at 22:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 29th March 2009 at 22:06.

Farmers had their delivery-prices reduced on a total of 12,762 beef cattle in 2008 because they were too dirty. In 2007 it was higher.

Cows in a field
Cows in a field
Photo: ©2015 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


Improvement

Norwegian farmers lost a total of seven million kroner last year, because they delivered cattle for slaughter that had too much dirt on them. One explanation for the reduction in numbers in comparison to 2007 could be that farmers have taken the problem seriously, and adopted measures that keep the animals cleaner.

Increased focus

The reasons for these measures are a result of the E-coli scandal of 2006. Six children, one of whom died, contracted a serious kidney infection from eating unhygienic meat. The Norwegian Food Authority was able to trace the meat back to dirty cattle.

A no-win situation

A dirty animal is a problem for a number of reasons. Whilst alive, it bothers the animal and is thus considered as bad treatment. Slaughtering a dirty animal hygienically is also extremely difficult, and something that carries a high risk of the dirt being transferred to the meat. Dirt in the meat also increases the chances of food poisoning.

The Norwegian Food Authority carries out regular checks that cattle are not dirty, both at the farm, and the abattoir.




Published on Thursday, 5th March, 2009 at 22:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 29th March 2009 at 22:06.

This post has the following tags: cows, meat, dirty, e-coli, food, authority, norwegian.





  
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