Aid organisations up in arms over Iraqi deportations / News / The Foreigner

Aid organisations up in arms over Iraqi deportations. Norwegian authorities ignore UN. Police forcibly deported 30 Iraqi asylum seekers early on Sunday morning in a blatant disregard for the UN. Aid organisations call the Government’s deportation policy scandalous, claiming they put refugees at risk in their home country. “Brutal” Sunday’s clandestine action, involving 66 police officers, was carried out despite earlier warnings from the UN’s Refugee Agency (UNHCR) that Iraqi refugees from central regions still needed international protection.

petter, eide, norwegian, peoples, aid, iraq, asylum, seekers, norway, deportation, knut, storberget, minister, justice, un, unhcr



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Aid organisations up in arms over Iraqi deportations

Published on Tuesday, 8th December, 2009 at 12:31 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Norwegian authorities ignore UN.

Doors open
Doors open
Photo: PearlyV/Flickr


Police forcibly deported 30 Iraqi asylum seekers early on Sunday morning in a blatant disregard for the UN. Aid organisations call the Government’s deportation policy scandalous, claiming they put refugees at risk in their home country.

“Brutal”

Sunday’s clandestine action, involving 66 police officers, was carried out despite earlier warnings from the UN’s Refugee Agency (UNHCR) that Iraqi refugees from central regions still needed international protection.

Amnesty’s secretary-general, Jon Petter Egenes, tells NRK he considers the deportations to be beneath criticism.

“The UN has asked that nobody be sent back as this area is considered to be extremely dangerous. People risk being subjected to criminal violence or getting killed in bomb attacks.”

Petter Eide
Petter Eide
Norwegian People's Aid/Flickr
And Petter Eide – secretary-general of Norwegian People’s Aid (NPA/Norsk Folkehjelp) – fears the deportation has stigmatised the entire group, even though 11 of the 30 have been convicted of criminal offences. He also thinks police have been heavy-handed.

“When people are sent out of the country in such a dramatic way, it gives the impression that (all of them) have done something wrong. I’m disappointed that the government has had no internal discussions about the matter, and that no-one has dared to rebel over their harsh, rough, and brutal treatment,” Eide says.

Unmoved

However, the Labour Party’s (Ap) Minister of Justice and the Police, Knut Storberget, has already warned that the Government is to clampdown on the flow of illegal immigrants coming to Norway.

Pål Lønseth, state secretary at Storberget’s ministry, says that Norwegian authorities have no intention of listening to what the UN says.

“The government’s view is that allowing criminals to stay is damaging. One can’t stay in Norway indefinitely once an (asylum) application has been rejected once and for all. We haven’t transferred sovereignty to the UN. Norway has to make its own, independent decision.”




Published on Tuesday, 8th December, 2009 at 12:31 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: petter, eide, norwegian, peoples, aid, iraq, asylum, seekers, norway, deportation, knut, storberget, minister, justice, un, unhcr.





  
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