Air raid shelters in short supply / News / The Foreigner

Air raid shelters in short supply. Norway’s 25,000 bomb shelters can only protect 2.5 million people in case of war and crisis, reports say. The refuges have been a big part in Norway’s protection during and since WWII. Today, however, there are warnings there will not be enough space to save the some five million Norwegian population in the event of military action.  Norway’s last bomb shelter was built in 1988. Rogaland, western Norway, currently has just 1,800 in private and public buildings.

kaarewilloch, norwaybombshelters, outdatednorwegianshelters



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Air raid shelters in short supply

Published on Friday, 13th January, 2012 at 17:45 under the news category, by John Price   .

Norway’s 25,000 bomb shelters can only protect 2.5 million people in case of war and crisis, reports say.

Norwegian mountain bomb shelter
Norwegian mountain bomb shelter
Photo: baekken/Flickr


The refuges have been a big part in Norway’s protection during and since WWII. Today, however, there are warnings there will not be enough space to save the some five million Norwegian population in the event of military action. 

Norway’s last bomb shelter was built in 1988. Rogaland, western Norway, currently has just 1,800 in private and public buildings.

Arne Bratlie, head of the region’s alerting and civil defence shelters, told NRK, “City dwellers were to be evacuated to the countryside during the Cold War. Key personnel took refuge in cities. There is less focus shelters today. Stavanger and Sandnes have experienced considerable migration, meaning there isn’t room for everyone.”

Concerns have also been raised about the general future of bomb shelters. There were suggestions two years ago they were outdated. 

Former Conservative Prime Minister Kåre Willoch, who headed the Commission for the Protection of Civil Infrastructure (CIP/Sårbarhetsutvalget), said he believed Norway had inadequate contingency plans. He was not reassured by authorities’ claims this is because the threat picture has changed.

“Preserving what we have is should be the minimum. My general impression is that we haven’t done this. The world doesn’t look particularly safe. Though the risk you’ll need one of these is small, it’s clearly more than zero,” he declared.



Published on Friday, 13th January, 2012 at 17:45 under the news category, by John Price   .

This post has the following tags: kaarewilloch, norwaybombshelters, outdatednorwegianshelters.





  
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