Algeria Crisis: Was Cameron last in line to know? / News / The Foreigner

Algeria Crisis: Was Cameron last in line to know?. OSLO: British Prime Minister David Cameron last week expressed displeasure at the lack of information he received during the unfolding of the Algerian hostage crisis. According to UK news sources, Cameron was heavily critical of the Algerian authorities for failing to warn Britain before the military assault on the In Aménas gas plant last week.  It emerged at Wednesday’s press conference in the Norwegian Parliament that Cameron may have been informed later than other national leaders of Algerian Special Forces’ storming of the In Aménas gas plant, at which Islamist militants were holding hundreds of hostages.

statoilalgeria, inamenasgasplant



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Algeria Crisis: Was Cameron last in line to know?

Published on Friday, 25th January, 2013 at 13:59 under the news category, by Ben McPherson.
Last Updated on 25th January 2013 at 18:15.

OSLO: British Prime Minister David Cameron last week expressed displeasure at the lack of information he received during the unfolding of the Algerian hostage crisis.

Jens Stoltenberg and Espen Barth Eide
Stoltenberg (L) and Barth Eide (R) at the press conferenceJens Stoltenberg and Espen Barth Eide
Photo: ©2013 Ben McPherson/The Foreigner


According to UK news sources, Cameron was heavily critical of the Algerian authorities for failing to warn Britain before the military assault on the In Aménas gas plant last week. 

It emerged at Wednesday’s press conference in the Norwegian Parliament that Cameron may have been informed later than other national leaders of Algerian Special Forces’ storming of the In Aménas gas plant, at which Islamist militants were holding hundreds of hostages.

Norwegian Foreign Minister Espen Barth Eide told journalists early in the crisis that there were no grounds for criticising Algerian authorities for the decision to storm the plant. He was asked to speculate on why he and David Cameron had disagreed, Wednesday.

“If I may say so, David Cameron more or less shares my opinion now, even though he started out somewhere else. The [other] affected countries now broadly agree with what we were saying all along.”

Cameron had modified his position by the time he made a statement to the British House of Commons on 20th January.

"Certainly, the Algerians believed that the lives of the hostages were always in imminent danger, that the terrorists were planning blow up the entire installation. This is one of the reasons why they acted as they did."

When pressed to explain Cameron’s earlier criticisms of the Algerian authorities, Minister Barth Eide said, “Perhaps you should ask him about that because we are all best at explaining what we mean ourselves.”

Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg played down the difference of opinion between Norway and Britain. 

“What he said was he would have preferred to have been informed before the action began on Thursday,” he told journalists.

“We said the same thing. But I think with the way things now look - assuming the information is correct - the military action wasn’t triggered because someone in the Algerian security forces chose to do it, but because the terrorists had tried to move all the hostages from the accommodation blocks to the gas plant.”

“So it goes without saying that there wasn’t much time to discuss things with other countries,” the Prime Minster declared.

Stoltenberg refused to comment on whether he had known more than David Cameron did. 

“I absolutely do not want to speculate on that. But I was in a situation where I spoke to the Algerian Prime Minister very shortly after the action had begun and therefore we were amongst the first people to be informed about it.”

“I daren’t say anything about when Cameron received that information, but the main point is that he, and I, and we, were informed after the action had begun on that Thursday.”




Published on Friday, 25th January, 2013 at 13:59 under the news category, by Ben McPherson.
Last updated on 25th January 2013 at 18:15.

This post has the following tags: statoilalgeria, inamenasgasplant.





  
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