Anti-racists criticise Norwegian musician / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Anti-racists criticise Norwegian musician. Norwegian NGOs are censuring singer-songwriter Hans Rotmo for being immigrant and Muslim-hostile following release of his new composition. Mr Rotmo’s song, ‘Vi fra andre’, is allegedly a pastiche on a poem by Norwegian writer Henrik Wergeland (1808-1845) from 1841 called ‘Vi ere en Nation, vi med’, which advocates 17th May – Norway’s National Day – should also be for children.  However, the connections with Wergeland’s work become more clouded in the singer-songwriter’s version. Norwegian Centre Against Racism director Kari Helene Partapuoli thinks the text is mostly in “extremely bad taste” and “malicious at times.”

henrikwergeland, norway17may, muslimsnorway, immigrationnorway



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Anti-racists criticise Norwegian musician

Published on Wednesday, 2nd May, 2012 at 16:22 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 2nd May 2012 at 20:27.

Norwegian NGOs are censuring singer-songwriter Hans Rotmo for being immigrant and Muslim-hostile following release of his new composition.



Mr Rotmo’s song, ‘Vi fra andre’, is allegedly a pastiche on a poem by Norwegian writer Henrik Wergeland (1808-1845) from 1841 called ‘Vi ere en Nation, vi med’, which advocates 17th May – Norway’s National Day – should also be for children. 

However, the connections with Wergeland’s work become more clouded in the singer-songwriter’s version. Norwegian Centre Against Racism director Kari Helene Partapuoli thinks the text is mostly in “extremely bad taste” and “malicious at times.”

“The entire text is based on quite a few simplistic prejudices against immigrants and Muslims in Norway,” she tells Adresseavisen, “it is a cheerful mixture of misguided xenophobia and incorrect assumptions about the Muslim revolution.”

Mr Rotmo’s text reads, "We are from other states, we rejoice in our new country and will never leave it. We are from distant skies but are not visiting, even if we smell of marijuana and onion and speak strangely when we talk.”

Still intending to be satiric, it also mentions Norway having the bluest sky and most peaceful life, the good welfare state through NAV, and that Norway is a country where one can keep religion, tradition get a free phone, and housing.

"We cut and slice in mushrooms and vaginas, on girls and boys, and new converts. Circumcision is our culture, and we have more in store. We are a nation with the nation within the nation.”

“In a few years, you will see that we will start the revolution that many have talked about, yes talked about but that never arrived. Bash the bankers – to jest moy dom insch Allah – come on, then. We work hard and p**s and s**t, more than both the Norwegians and Brits. Every Turk, Mexican, and Pole is always broke,” the song concludes. 

In an email to The Foreigner, Kari Helene Partapuoli writes, “Ridiculing immigration and criticism of Islam's role in society is fine, of course, but I think Mr Rotmo is wide of the mark here. Although ridicule should have some basis in reality, Norwegian Muslims are also used to both hearing and enduring a lot.”

“I also think it is appropriate to remind Mr Rotmo that the vast majority of immigrants to Norway are immigrants from Poland and the Baltic countries. They come to work, and not to go to the NAV offices as he writes. Some are also badly exploited by the Norwegian employment market. Moreover, the trade union movement, which Mr Rotmo has sung so positively about before, has also involved itself in Eastern European workers' rights.”

Mr Rotmo says to Adresseavisen, “people are different and offended by various different things. It’s up to her [Ms Partapuoli] view if she experiences it [the song] as being so [malicious]. I think the song is funny and haven’t reflected so much more about it.”

“I think it’s fantastic that one song has got so much attention. Not everyone just writes silly songs about love. I release songs, and that’s it,” he exclaims.

“I believe Mr Rotmo will get a lot out of visiting a Norwegian Muslim for tea through the Teatime initiative. It’s clear he knows very little about this minority in Norway,” concludes Kari Helene Partapuoli.

Henrik Wergeland was instrumental in fighting local Oslo (then, Christiania) officials’ enforcing a royal decree, which banned celebrating 17th May whilst under Swedish rule.

He also got the last sentence of so-called ‘Paragraph 2’ removed from the Norwegian Constitution in 1851 and 1892, respectively, which originally read, "The Evangelical-Lutheran religion remains the public religion of the State. Those inhabitants, who confess thereto, are bound to raise their children to the same Jesuits and monastic orders are not permitted. Jews are still prohibited from entry to the Realm.”

Jews pay their respects at Wergeland’s grave in Oslo every 17th May. The Nazis also forbade any celebration of Wergeland during their WWII occupation of Norway. Whilst the penultimate sentence was struck in 1897, it was not until 1956 the ban was lifted on Jesuits.



Published on Wednesday, 2nd May, 2012 at 16:22 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 2nd May 2012 at 20:27.

This post has the following tags: henrikwergeland, norway17may, muslimsnorway, immigrationnorway.





  
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