Authorities lop the Lupine / News / The Foreigner

Authorities lop the Lupine. They are easily visible along the roads and loved by many. But colorful lupines do not impress Norway’s Environment Agency. Many are so fond of the Lupine that they collect seeds for their gardens. According to the Norwegian Biodiversity Information Centre, there are at least 500 million lupines along roads and in parks. The Directorate of Public Roads planted lupines along Norway’s traffic routes. But the Lupinus is now blacklisted for endangering biological diversity. The flowering plant spreads rapidly, but is crowding out other species and causing considerable damage to the ecosystem.

ecosystem, lupin



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Authorities lop the Lupine

Published on Monday, 17th August, 2015 at 12:33 under the news category, by Tove Andersson.
Last Updated on 17th August 2015 at 22:37.

They are easily visible along the roads and loved by many. But colorful lupines do not impress Norway’s Environment Agency.

Lupines in a field with cows
Lupines in a field with cows
Photo: Tove Andersson


Many are so fond of the Lupine that they collect seeds for their gardens. According to the Norwegian Biodiversity Information Centre, there are at least 500 million lupines along roads and in parks. The Directorate of Public Roads planted lupines along Norway’s traffic routes.

But the Lupinus is now blacklisted for endangering biological diversity. The flowering plant spreads rapidly, but is crowding out other species and causing considerable damage to the ecosystem.

New rules, which take effect on 1st January 2016, are designed to prohibit numbers of the most invasive alien plants that grow in Norway – including the Lupine. Norwegians risk a visit from the "plant police", who might come to their gardens and eradicate them.

Authorities are not telling the whole story, however, as some varieties of lupine are not banned.

This includes the so-termed Russell Lupine hybrid (Lupinus X russellii hort (L. x regalis)) – cultivated by horticulturalist George Russell (1857-1951) from York in the UK (a L. polyphyllus, L. arboreus, L.sulphureus, and one or more annual species mix).

Another is the Sweet Lupine, which is actually used as flour. It is uniquely high in protein (up to 40%) and dietary fiber and contains minimal starch.

Are all lupine variants equally bad?

“No sanctions are proposed regarding the Lupinus x regalis as this does not reproduce,” says the Norwegian Environment Agency’s Esten Ødegaard.



Published on Monday, 17th August, 2015 at 12:33 under the news category, by Tove Andersson.
Last updated on 17th August 2015 at 22:37.

This post has the following tags: ecosystem, lupin.





  
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