Books becoming parlour pariahs / News / The Foreigner

Books becoming parlour pariahs. Norwegians are banishing literary works from their living rooms for the sake of fashion. As shredding costs become prohibitive, handwriting skills decline, and penmanship fades, the paper-screen and dust bunny battles are prompting Scandinavians to favour giving tomes the old heave-ho. Time pressures, lack of space in smaller apartments, and a preference for digital devices are consigning books to the same out-of-sight places as LPs and CDs too, NRK also reports.

books, fashion, homes, norway



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Books becoming parlour pariahs

Published on Tuesday, 2nd December, 2014 at 12:19 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 2nd December 2014 at 13:03.

Norwegians are banishing literary works from their living rooms for the sake of fashion.

Bookcase and ladder
This sight (without the ladder) is becoming rarer in homes in Norway.Bookcase and ladder
Photo: Robin Zebrowski/Flickr


As shredding costs become prohibitive, handwriting skills decline, and penmanship fades, the paper-screen and dust bunny battles are prompting Scandinavians to favour giving tomes the old heave-ho.

Time pressures, lack of space in smaller apartments, and a preference for digital devices are consigning books to the same out-of-sight places as LPs and CDs too, NRK also reports.

“Books disappear when people want clean surfaces,” author and trend expert Ståle Økland told NRK.

Born in 1975 in western Norway, polyglot Mr Økland founded Global Retail Trends in 2007. His educational disciplines are sociology, history, and German.

He has written three Norwegian-language books dealing with what trends are and how they start (Trendmania, 2011), how to create innovative culture (Tenk som en rockstjerne, 2013), and why certain cities in Norway win or lose on the cultural and design front (Bykamp,2014).

According to his biography on the company’s website, his lecture at European Trend Day in Zurich is among events he has spoken at.

Mr Økland tells The Foreigner that predicting the future “is always difficult, as trends change all the time. However, there could be a totally new picture if everything becomes part of the digital society. It’s then not just about interiors.”

What of the fate of the tangible, heavy, and glossy coffee table books?

“These are still quite popular, and the era of books isn’t over. People choose books that they like and a lot of publishers know this. They produce so-termed better value books. It’s about the design and pictures in this case.”

Is the book banning a language free-for-all, or language specific?

“That’s difficult to say, because most Norwegian books are hardbacks and read in this form. When it comes to the US market, for example, more books are published for reading on Kindles.”

And while some hardback books can be heavy, medical personnel have reported that an increasing number of tablet users are being treated for repetitive strain injuries.



Published on Tuesday, 2nd December, 2014 at 12:19 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 2nd December 2014 at 13:03.

This post has the following tags: books, fashion, homes, norway.





  
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