Borrelia bearing ticks on the increase / News / The Foreigner

Borrelia bearing ticks on the increase. One in four ticks in Norway carries the Borrelia infection and the number is rising, a new doctoral thesis approved by the Norwegian School of Veterinary Medicine shows. Molecular biologist Vivian Kjelland collected 6,538 migratory from birds caught at Lista Ornithological Station in Vest-Agder. Whilst different studies in other parts of the country show between 0 and 17 percent of ticks are Borrelia bearers, the figure is 25 in Øst and Vest-Agder counties. “There is a much higher chance of becoming infected if you are bitten in Øst and Vest-Agder municipalities than we first thought,” she tells NTB.

borreliaticksnorway, lymedisease



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Borrelia bearing ticks on the increase

Published on Thursday, 30th June, 2011 at 12:57 under the news category, by Alison Kennedy.

One in four ticks in Norway carries the Borrelia infection and the number is rising, a new doctoral thesis approved by the Norwegian School of Veterinary Medicine shows.

Adult deer tick (magnified)
Adult deer tick (magnified)
Photo: Scott Bauer/PD-USGov-USDA-ARS


Molecular biologist Vivian Kjelland collected 6,538 migratory from birds caught at Lista Ornithological Station in Vest-Agder. Whilst different studies in other parts of the country show between 0 and 17 percent of ticks are Borrelia bearers, the figure is 25 in Øst and Vest-Agder counties.

“There is a much higher chance of becoming infected if you are bitten in Øst and Vest-Agder municipalities than we first thought,” she tells NTB.

“Estimates as to the amount of Borreliainfectedticksvariesgeographically, from yearto year,andthroughout the season,” the researcher continues, arguing further existing statistics are difficult to verify because they are outdated and use different methods.”

Ms Kjelland has also found a new strain of Borrelia. Migratory birds bring four million ticks into Norway each year. However, she is unsure if this has spread to other parts of the country yet.

“It was found in all places we collectedticksin bothcounties, suggesting thatit is widespread.”

The most common tick in Norway is the Forest Tick which can also be carried by deer, according to Science Daily. Borrelia can cause Lyme Disease.



Published on Thursday, 30th June, 2011 at 12:57 under the news category, by Alison Kennedy.

This post has the following tags: borreliaticksnorway, lymedisease.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!