Breivik Trial Day 34: Diagnoses and Knights Templar called into question again / News / The Foreigner

Breivik Trial Day 34: Diagnoses and Knights Templar called into question again. UPDATED: Today’s trial witnesses included forensic psychology expert Pål Grøndahl, top Norwegian psychiatry professor Einar Kringlen and Eirik Johannesen from Bærum's psychiatric outpatient clinic. The defence also called in experts that had observed Breivik’s behaviour during his time at Ila. Professor Einar Kringlen was the first to give evidence telling the court that he would not be introducing any new diagnosis.

andersbehringbreivik, breiviktrialoslo, oslodistrictcourt, utoeyashootings, utoya



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Breivik Trial Day 34: Diagnoses and Knights Templar called into question again

Published on Sunday, 10th June, 2012 at 22:08 under the news category, by Ben McPherson and Geetika Nautiyal and Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 11th June 2012 at 23:25.

UPDATED: Today’s trial witnesses included forensic psychology expert Pål Grøndahl, top Norwegian psychiatry professor Einar Kringlen and Eirik Johannesen from Bærum's psychiatric outpatient clinic.

Lippestad, Breivik, Hein Bæra
Lippestad, Breivik, Hein Bæra
Photo: ©2012 Ben McPherson/The Foreigner


The defence also called in experts that had observed Breivik’s behaviour during his time at Ila.

Professor Einar Kringlen was the first to give evidence telling the court that he would not be introducing any new diagnosis.

He explained that the symptoms of schizophrenia tend to emerge between the ages of 18 and 20, but can appear suddenly even if the sufferer was acting normally before.

The professor had believed Breivik to be suffering from schizophrenia but after observing him in court, he now believes him to be legally sane.

Professor Kringlen agrees with the second psychiatric report that diagnosed Breivik as someone suffering personality disorders.

Questions were raised once again over the Knights Templar and whether Breivik’s belief that he was working for the organisation could be seen as a delusion. Kringlen says that the evidence points against it.

He told the court that he was not a big believer in psychiatric tests as people are able to lie in order to appear saner than they are. He said that he prefers good conversation.

After a short break, Eirik Johannesen took over from Kringlen on the witness stand. Johannesen is from Bærum's psychiatric outpatient clinic and also works one day a week in Ila prison.

He has had around 20 meetings with Breivik that lasted 90 minutes each, and told the court that Breivik refused to take any psychiatric or IQ tests he wanted to perform.

Johannesen says that Breivik seems to show very little remorse for his actions and is aware of how psychology can be used to manipulate people.

Eirik Johannesen also told the court that he disagrees with Professor Ulrik Malt’s diagnosis given during Friday’s proceedings that Breivik suffered from Aspergers Syndrome.

When questioned by defence lawyer Geir Lippestad about Breivik’s behaviour Johannesen said, “He's very concerned to be friendly and polite. He's very concerned with etiquette. But he's probably more relaxed [in prison] than he is here.”

Johannesen also explained that Breivik talked a lot about “We” at the beginning as well as rightwing networks, but that his focus appears to have shifted referring more to “I” when talking.

The expert said that Breivik has big ambitions but does not have the skills to achieve them.

Breivik commented that he was glad that the witness did not consider him insane. He also stated that the reason he doesn’t empathise is due to his military training.

After the lunch break Ila psychiatrist Arnhild Flikke, who has worked a lot with sufferers of schizophrenia and psychosis, gave testimony.

Flikke has had 10 meetings with Breivik since first meeting him in September, and said that she does not believe Breivik suffers from psychosis.

She explained that in her experience, people suffering from psychosis or schizophrenia often experience voices in their head and does not believe that Breivik shares this experience.

Lippestad asked Flikke about the Knights Templar, to which she replied that she does not know whether the organisation exists. The prosecution also mentioned the Knights Templar.

The witness said that the thing she is most confident about is that Breivik travelled to Liberia and London.

Flikke explained that Breivik does not remember the faces of those that he killed in July and that he had wanted to kill everyone that had been on the island.

She also said she believes that Breivik is criminally liable for the actions he took in July.

Flikke was also asked questions by the judge, who wanted to know if it was difficult to diagnose Breivik. The testimony concluded after these questions.

The third witness was Maria Sigurjonsdottir, also a psychiatrist. The defence began by asking about her role as an observer.

She said that when beginning to observe Breivik they did not want to diagnose along the way, they only observed symptoms until the end of the observation period.

Sigurjonsdottir described what she witnessed during the observation, saying that Breivik showed good long and short-term memory, good concentration and spoke coherently.

She said that none of the people observing Breivik believed that he was psychotic or suffering from delusions.

When questioned by Lippestad, Sigurjonsdottir stated that Breivik thought that he had a convincing argument for his political views.

After a break, Alexander Flataa took the stand. During his testimony, he said that 18 experienced professionals observed Breivik during a three week period but that no signs of psychosis emerged.

Nursing expert Bente Sundbye was the last to testify, and was asked about her part in Breivik’s observation.

She too stated that Breivik showed good memory and concentration which would have been difficult if he was psychotic.


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Published on Sunday, 10th June, 2012 at 22:08 under the news category, by Ben McPherson and Geetika Nautiyal and Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 11th June 2012 at 23:25.

This post has the following tags: andersbehringbreivik, breiviktrialoslo, oslodistrictcourt, utoeyashootings, utoya.





  
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