Breivik trial Day 42: Prosecution in doubt about perpetrator’s mental state / News / The Foreigner

Breivik trial Day 42: Prosecution in doubt about perpetrator’s mental state. UPDATED: Prosecutor Inga Bejer Engh was the first to speak in court today, and was asked by translators there to speak slowly as she began the closing arguments of the prosecution. Engh told the court that the prosecution want to put the facts established over the ten week trial into the right context saying that Breivik’s attacks have left many people traumatised for life. She said that Breivik as the perpetrator must be held accountable for the deaths of 77 people and the injuries suffered by others, stating the trial has been about these people.

andersbehringbreivik, breiviktrialoslo, oslodistrictcourt, utoeyashootings, utoya



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Breivik trial Day 42: Prosecution in doubt about perpetrator’s mental state

Published on Wednesday, 20th June, 2012 at 22:06 under the news category, by Geetika Nautiyal and Ben McPherson and Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 24th June 2012 at 16:31.

UPDATED: Prosecutor Inga Bejer Engh was the first to speak in court today, and was asked by translators there to speak slowly as she began the closing arguments of the prosecution.

Geir Lippestad and Anders Behring Breivik
Geir Lippestad and Anders Behring Breivik
Photo: ©2012 Ben McPherson/The Foreigner


Engh told the court that the prosecution want to put the facts established over the ten week trial into the right context saying that Breivik’s attacks have left many people traumatised for life.

She said that Breivik as the perpetrator must be held accountable for the deaths of 77 people and the injuries suffered by others, stating the trial has been about these people.

Engh told the court how those affected the most by 22nd July have all said that their lives will not be stopped by Breivik’s actions.

She stated that she has to remind herself that what happened was a reality as the events were so gruesome, and that it is made worse because the act was planned over many years.

Engh explained how the prosecution’s closing arguments would consist of the first three out of the four conditions that are needed for someone to be sentenced under Norwegian law.

These four conditions are the action must be punishable by law, it cannot be done through necessity, the guilt must be established, and the perpetrator must be criminally responsible.

Other prosecutor Svein Holden will bring in the question of Breivik’s sanity to argue the final condition about criminal responsibility, she said.

Engh explained that the job of the prosecution was objectivity and that although its one of the worst cases seen, it must be treated like any other criminal case.

She stated that questions about how many people Breivik wanted to kill on that day as well as whether he is ill or not will remain unanswered.

She also brought up questions that have been raised about the role of the police, the debates about the Board of Forensic Medicine, and debates about rules and procedures.

During her address to the court, Engh once again focused on the topic of the Knight’s Templar.

Engh also talked about the Serbian war hero, Breivik’s compendium, the Progress Party (FrP) and the game World of Warcraft.

She described the bomb blast and how there were 250 people in the government building at the time, with 75 people on the street below, and that they cannot say how many people were in danger when the explosion happened.

Engh said the prosecution did not believe Breivik when he claimed he would not have gone to carry out the shootings on Utøya if more had died in the explosion at the government quarter.

Utøya was also discussed, with Engh saying that many of those killed were shot in the head and most had been shot more than once. She recounted that 56 of those killed were under the age of 20.

When discussing Breivik’s guilt, Engh declared there is no doubt over the planning and premeditation of the murders.

Svein Holden began discussing whether Breivik is criminally insane and stated that the main emphasis should be on what the psychiatric experts have said.

Holden told the court to disregard Breivik’s wish to be found criminally responsible for the attacks, saying that if psychosis cannot be safely excluded, then Breivik cannot be found guilty.

Holden went through the process of the first psychiatric report and its findings as well as mentioning the Knights Templar. He concluded by arguing that Breivik is insane.


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Published on Wednesday, 20th June, 2012 at 22:06 under the news category, by Geetika Nautiyal and Ben McPherson and Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 24th June 2012 at 16:31.

This post has the following tags: andersbehringbreivik, breiviktrialoslo, oslodistrictcourt, utoeyashootings, utoya.





  
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