British mathematician wins Abel Prize / News / The Foreigner

British mathematician wins Abel Prize. The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters awards this year’s honour to Oxford University’s Sir Andrew J. Wiles. Announcing their decision, the Committee said they chose to award the Laureate the Abel Prize “for his stunning proof of Fermat’s Last Theorem by way of the modularity conjecture for semistable elliptic curves, opening a new era in number theory.” The prize, which has been awarded annually since 2003, recognises contributions of extraordinary depth and influence to the mathematical sciences.

aibelprize, fermat, maths, paywall



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British mathematician wins Abel Prize

Published on Tuesday, 15th March, 2016 at 20:53 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters awards this year’s honour to Oxford University’s Sir Andrew J. Wiles.

Sir Andrew J. Wiles
The British mathematician pictured in 1995.Sir Andrew J. Wiles
Photo: Klaus Barner/Wikimedia Commons


Announcing their decision, the Committee said they chose to award the Laureate the Abel Prize “for his stunning proof of Fermat’s Last Theorem by way of the modularity conjecture for semistable elliptic curves, opening a new era in number theory.”

The prize, which has been awarded annually since 2003, recognises contributions of extraordinary depth and influence to the mathematical sciences.

Sir Andrew solved Fermat’s Last Theorem in 1994, the most famous and long-running, unsolved problem in the subject’s history.

The mathematician discovered the theorem aged ten after finding a copy of a book in his local library in Cambridge. It had remained unsolved for 300 years at that time.

“I knew from that moment that I would never let it go. I had to solve it,” he said.

The Abel Committee also explained that “few results have as rich a mathematical history and as dramatic a proof as Fermat’s Last Theorem.”

Sir Andrew J. Wiles will receive the Prize on the 24th May, which will be awarded by HRH Crown Prince Haakon of Norway at the ceremony in Oslo.

The Abel Prize is given in the form of a cash award of NOK 6,000,000 (roughly about EUR 600,000 or USD 700,000).



Published on Tuesday, 15th March, 2016 at 20:53 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: aibelprize, fermat, maths, paywall.





  
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