British researchers to chart Northern England’s Viking legacy / News / The Foreigner

British researchers to chart Northern England’s Viking legacy. Norwegian men to be tested for key gene. The Northern England Viking settlers are under scrutiny. A group of British researchers led by Professor Peter Harding at the University of Nottingham is to try and trace their roots. According to Harald Løvvik, the project’s coordinator in Norway, scientists aim to uncover where descendants of the Vikings live, and will be concentrating on the Y chromosome, as it can only be passed on from father to son.

viking, genes, heritage, test, researchers, scientists, norway, northern, england



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British researchers to chart Northern England’s Viking legacy

Published on Monday, 5th April, 2010 at 08:09 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Norwegian men to be tested for key gene.

Viking "Valhalla" ship,Petersburg,Alaska
Viking "Valhalla" ship,Petersburg,Alaska
Photo: Hans-Jürgen Hübner/Wikimedia Commons


The Northern England Viking settlers are under scrutiny. A group of British researchers led by Professor Peter Harding at the University of Nottingham is to try and trace their roots.

According to Harald Løvvik, the project’s coordinator in Norway, scientists aim to uncover where descendants of the Vikings live, and will be concentrating on the Y chromosome, as it can only be passed on from father to son.

Researchers will be testing people from Sognefjorden, Hardangerfjorden, Ryfylkefjorden, Gudbrandsdalen, Namdalen, Hedmark, Stavanger, Bergen, and Trondheim.

A sample taken from the mouth of 20 volunteers from each region, with a paternal line going back six or seven generations in the same area, will then be sent to the University of Leicester; one of the leading European DNA research environments.

“Many believe that most of us are related to the Vikings, but it isn’t as evident as it seems,” Løvvik tells NTB.



Published on Monday, 5th April, 2010 at 08:09 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: viking, genes, heritage, test, researchers, scientists, norway, northern, england.





  
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