British rowers fail to beat Norwegian rowing feat / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner British rowers fail to beat Norwegian rowing feat. Elliott Dale and Chris Walters tried to better the 118 year old North Atlantic crossing record last week, but missed by five days. Messrs Dale and Walters, both 55, row for the Cornish Gib Club in Lyme. They reached the Isles of Scilly off the coast of Cornwall in 60 days. The unbroken record of 55 days was set by Norwegian-American immigrants Frank Samuelsen and George Harbo in 1896. Samuelsen and Harbo were typical mariners of their time. Frank Samuelsen was born in Southern Norway’s Farsund in 1870. Like boys of his time, went to sea at age 17. He rose through the maritime chain of command to be a boson’s mate. After six years sailing the world, he settled in the New York area and became a clammer on the Atlantic Higlands off the New Jersey coast.

rowing, northatlantic, record, norwegian, norway, britain, uk



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British rowers fail to beat Norwegian rowing feat

Published on Monday, 11th August, 2014 at 01:32 under the news category, by M. Michael Brady.
Last Updated on 11th August 2014 at 18:06.

Elliott Dale and Chris Walters tried to better the 118 year old North Atlantic crossing record last week, but missed by five days.



Messrs Dale and Walters, both 55, row for the Cornish Gib Club in Lyme. They reached the Isles of Scilly off the coast of Cornwall in 60 days. The unbroken record of 55 days was set by Norwegian-American immigrants Frank Samuelsen and George Harbo in 1896.

Samuelsen and Harbo were typical mariners of their time. Frank Samuelsen was born in Southern Norway’s Farsund in 1870. Like boys of his time, went to sea at age 17. He rose through the maritime chain of command to be a boson’s mate. After six years sailing the world, he settled in the New York area and became a clammer on the Atlantic Higlands off the New Jersey coast.

George Harbo was born in Sandefjord, Eastern Norway, in 1864. He also went to sea in his teens and had been a surf fisherman and pilot before clamming on the Atlantic Highlands in a boat of his own design. He met and became friends with fellow clammer Samuelsen.

A prize of $10,000 offered by Richard Fox, publisher of the National Police Gazette for the first men to row across the Atlantic, triggered their pair row across the Atlantic. They built “Fox”, an 18-foot ship-lap oak rowboat with two floatation compartment and two rowing benches, and named it after the publisher offering the prize.

Their navigation and safety gear was a compass, a sextant and a copy of the Nautical Almanac. They set out from the Battery in New York on 6 June 1896 and arrived at the Isles of Scilly 55 days later. Publisher Fox awarded them gold medals, but the promised prize money never appeared.

For absolute speed, the Samuelsen-Harbo Atlantic crossing record has been beaten by 11 days by a British-led four-man “quad rowing” team in a modern lightweight vessel equipped with high-tech safety gear. It completed the crossing in June-July 2010, meaning the 118 year old record of the Norwegian first pair rowing record across the North Atlantic still stands.



Published on Monday, 11th August, 2014 at 01:32 under the news category, by M. Michael Brady.
Last updated on 11th August 2014 at 18:06.

This post has the following tags: rowing, northatlantic, record, norwegian, norway, britain, uk.





  
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