Budget 2017: Sweets, smoking, and saloons / News / The Foreigner

Budget 2017: Sweets, smoking, and saloons. This year’s draft proposal will reduce taxes on earnings, but Norway’s wide-ranging tax and duty system is due will be syphoning off funds from pockets in a different fashion. The general VAT rate of 25 per cent remains unchanged, but increases of some 2 per cent are tabled for many goods. Those with a sweet tooth or people who just like sugary products will notice that these treats will increase in price. The krone per kilo duty is set to rise from 7.66 to 7.81. Sweet drinks such berry-based squashes and syrups without added sugar and concentrates (with or without sugar) are to rise between 1.8 and 2.1 per cent.

petrol, budget, alcohol, sweets, vehicles, money, tax, paywall



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Budget 2017: Sweets, smoking, and saloons

Published on Thursday, 6th October, 2016 at 20:25 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 13th October 2016 at 21:17.

This year’s draft proposal will reduce taxes on earnings, but Norway’s wide-ranging tax and duty system is due will be syphoning off funds from pockets in a different fashion.

Uncut sheet of 200-kroner notes
Uncut sheet of 200-kroner notes
Photo: Katrine Lunke/Norges Bank


The general VAT rate of 25 per cent remains unchanged, but increases of some 2 per cent are tabled for many goods. Those with a sweet tooth or people who just like sugary products will notice that these treats will increase in price.

The krone per kilo duty is set to rise from 7.66 to 7.81. Sweet drinks such berry-based squashes and syrups without added sugar and concentrates (with or without sugar) are to rise between 1.8 and 2.1 per cent.

This means krone per litre prices of between 1.67 and 20.32, depending on the product. Sweets and chocolates will also cost 2 per cent more, with the krone per kilogram levy increasing from 19.79 to 20.19.

Having a smoke will also incur extra charges of some 2 per cent. Cigars, loose tobacco will increase from 250 to 255 kroner per 100 grams (as well as cigarettes per hundred), and snus to 103 kroner from 101. Chewing tobacco and cigarette papers will also become more expensive.

Alcohol in famously expensive Norway will also cost more. Increases of 2 per cent are proposed on drinks of 2.7 to 4.7 per cent alcohol by volume (e.g. beer and cider), which equates to an extra 12.54 and 21.72 kroner per litre, respectively.

The government also wishes to raise the price of some other types of drinks of between 4.7 and 22 per cent alcohol by volume by 2.1 per cent (which includes wine). This will mean an extra 4.86 kroner per litre. Spirits will increase by 7.46 kroner per litre (2.1 per cent), should the current proposal pass.

Present figures show that car drivers are due to be penalised when it comes to amount of fuel they use. Duty on petrol is set to rise by 5 per cent – bringing it to 5.24 kroner per litre – but the largest increase is on diesel, at 12.2 per cent. This means each litre will cost an extra 3.86 kroner.

The NOx cost per mg per kilometer increase will be 22.4 per cent (70.93 kroner), and the CO2 cost per gram per cubic kilometer remains unchanged from last year.

At the same time, vehicle users will benefit from cuts in the price of annual road tax. Those with a factory-fitted petrol or diesel particulate filter will have 10 per cent knocked off this bill (from 3,125 to 2,820 kroner per year). The same 10 per cent reduction will apply to diesel-driven vehicles without this, with the annual price sinking from 3,655 to 3,290 kroner.

But motorbike and moped users will have to spend more. Their annual road tax increase will be by 2.1 and 2.2 per cent, respectively. This brings their respective per year price to 1,960 and 455 kroner.

And while the one-time new vehicle registration fee will not change for all engine powers, the weight-based annual tax and re-registration levies will rise by 2 per cent – meaning the price will vary.




Published on Thursday, 6th October, 2016 at 20:25 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 13th October 2016 at 21:17.

This post has the following tags: petrol, budget, alcohol, sweets, vehicles, money, tax, paywall.





  
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