Bureaucrats delay Oslo rape enquiries / News / The Foreigner

Bureaucrats delay Oslo rape enquiries. Public and private actors disagree about how to solve Oslo’s recent rape crime-wave whilst a serial rapist could be on the loose. Amongst differing opinions also come warnings that Anders Behring Breivik could have inspired whoever is behind them. 51 reported assault rapes have been reported in Oslo so far this year. Aftenposten claims it has seen official police figures showing 43 of these occurred between 10 pm and 6 am the next day. 38 happened in the six hours from midnight. The paper also reveals three reported assault rapes took place in broad daylight; on 18 March on Alnabruveien at 11:30, in Tøyenparken at about 17:00 on 13 July, and at approximately 3 pm on 5 September in Inkognitogata. A further previously undisclosed assault rape also occured at 3 am on 22 October on Ulvøya.

andersbehringbreivik, oslorapes, norwegianpolice, knutstorberget



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Bureaucrats delay Oslo rape enquiries

Published on Wednesday, 2nd November, 2011 at 18:14 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Public and private actors disagree about how to solve Oslo’s recent rape crime-wave whilst a serial rapist could be on the loose. Amongst differing opinions also come warnings that Anders Behring Breivik could have inspired whoever is behind them.

Mercedes Benz Vito police van
Mercedes Benz Vito police van
Photo: © 2007 J. P. Fagerback/Wikimedia Commons


Quality fears

51 reported assault rapes have been reported in Oslo so far this year. Aftenposten claims it has seen official police figures showing 43 of these occurred between 10 pm and 6 am the next day. 38 happened in the six hours from midnight.

The paper also reveals three reported assault rapes took place in broad daylight; on 18 March on Alnabruveien at 11:30, in Tøyenparken at about 17:00 on 13 July, and at approximately 3 pm on 5 September in Inkognitogata. A further previously undisclosed assault rape also occured at 3 am on 22 October on Ulvøya.

As investigators try to piece together whether one serial rapist or several rapists are responsible for the most recent attacks, it is revealed they use just one forensic genetic lab in the whole country.

Amongst unwillingness to commercialise the branch, unlike in the UK, for example, government officials have decided only the Institute of Public Health is to carry out all forensic analysis.

The Ministry of Justice argues this is because “gathering and securing evidence in criminal cases falls under [the responsibility of] the police and prosecuting authorities”.

Another publicly funded alternative is available at the University of Tromsø, but budget constraints will prevent it from being used to its full capacity.

The centre’s project leader, Lars Uhlin-Hansen, says, “We were given 10 million kroner over 3 years by Parliament to build up a forensic genetic centre attached to the university. Parliament wanted an alternative environment both for academic reasons and out of consideration for legal safeguards.”

“Everything is ready but we’re lacking a computerised solution, making it impossible to report things electronically. This costs 5 million kroner. We don’t have the money any won’t receive the allocations in next year’s proposed national budget,” he continues.

Oslo police are currently waiting for DNA results to 16 rape cases from the Institute of Public Health. Nevertheless, Officer Hanne Kristin Rohde states that, “We have a good cooperation with them, and get quick answers in urgent cases, at the most one or two weeks.”

“It’s quality that counts, and we are very satisfied with the service provided,” she says, not wishing to confirm how long they have been waiting.

Not difficult

Minister of Justice Knut Storberget has convened a meeting between Oslo police, police officials, National Crime investigators (Kripos) and the Director of Public Prosecutions (Riksadvokaten), Friday.

Aftenposten reports police figures show 22 assault rapes took place early on or slightly later on Sundays, 11 on Saturdays, 5 on Wednesdays, the same on Fridays. For Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays, assault rape statistics are 4,2, and 2, respectively.

Confirming he will not be considering a private DNA analysis solution, however, the minister declares, “I think the Institute of Public Health conducts very good analysis. It also carries this out very quickly in prioritized cases. The fact it takes time is due to other things.”

“The whole procedure is normally completed in about six hours,” Ragne Kristin Farmen, manager of Gena, a private DNA analysis institute in Stavanger, tells The Foreigner.

Rather like programmes such as CSI, most samples come as swabs with small DNA fragments from bodily fluids, human skin or hair. Sometimes, the material is on the victims’ clothing.

“We cut off the tip of the swab, or a cut small piece of the fabric and then extract the DNA. This takes approximately an hour. The sample is then put into a PCR machine (polymerase chain reaction), which copies the small DNA fragments a few million times to provide a sufficient DNA fingerprint. 100 cells are enough. Less than half-a-teaspoon – 1 millilitre – of blood contains 10 million,” she says.

Approximately three hours later, the machine has divided the cells and an producing a DNA fingerprint takes another hour.

“Depending on the complexity of interpreting this, the entire procedure is complete one hour later.”

Latent

Meanwhile, Peter Gill, a Swedish violence researcher, believes Anders Behring Breivik’s attacks could have inspired the rapist(s).

“What is special about Breivik is that he brought an evil thought to life. There are many children who are bullied, aggressive, but they don’t turn thoughts into grounds because of that,” he tells Vårt Land.

He admits drawing a connection between a rise in Oslo’s assault rapes and Breivik’s actions could be “pure speculation” unless it “turns out not to be coincidental.”

The professor also warns that people could be committing a major mistake by thinking Breivik is a mad man.

“Everyone has parts of Breivik inside them. However, he put these together. There are also men in Norway who are quietly impressed by what Breivik managed to do. This could trigger others to cross the line too.”




Published on Wednesday, 2nd November, 2011 at 18:14 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: andersbehringbreivik, oslorapes, norwegianpolice, knutstorberget.





  
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