Cemetery defecations cause moving contemplation / News / The Foreigner

Cemetery defecations cause moving contemplation. An Italian widower is considering taking his deceased wife home to Italy due to dogs’ excretions. He wants canines banned from the burial ground. Salvatore Curto lost his wife last year and visits her grave at Eiganes Cemetery in western Norway’s Stavanger almost every day. He often observes dog owners allowing their animals to urinate and/or defecate in the burial grounds.

cemeteries, stavanger, dogs, death, mourning, grief, paywall



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Cemetery defecations cause moving contemplation

Published on Friday, 14th October, 2016 at 17:49 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.

An Italian widower is considering taking his deceased wife home to Italy due to dogs’ excretions. He wants canines banned from the burial ground.

Eiganes Cemetery Chapel
Eiganes Cemetery Chapel
Photo: Ztarbreaker/Wikimedia Commons


Salvatore Curto lost his wife last year and visits her grave at Eiganes Cemetery in western Norway’s Stavanger almost every day.

He often observes dog owners allowing their animals to urinate and/or defecate in the burial grounds.

Rogalands Avis (RA) also reports that he says this sometimes takes place on top of the graves, which makes him nauseous.

“Our dearly departed lie buried here, and I think that letting the animals excrete here shows a complete lack of respect,” he told the local publication.

Per Øyvind Skrede, Stavanger municipality’s head of cemeteries, informed NRK that walking dogs in a burial ground is not against the law, though they must be on a lead.

“But there are rules which dictate how dogs are to behave whilst there with their owners,” he added.

Signore Curto has placed signs in the graveyard to try to prevent dog owners from allowing their animals to excrete waste, but these have gone.

He told RA that he has nothing against dogs, but that “it’s a holy place, and should be treated as one.”

Italy does not allow these animals inside cemeteries.

The widower has sent a letter to the Bishop of Stavanger, Erling Pettersen, to try and prevent owners from walking their dogs there.

“It disturbs my grieving. […] I cry inside when I think of my wife being buried in ground upon which dogs do their business,” Signore Curto said to NRK.

“I actually want to move and take my wife with me to Italy,” he concluded.



Published on Friday, 14th October, 2016 at 17:49 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.

This post has the following tags: cemeteries, stavanger, dogs, death, mourning, grief, paywall.





  
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