Child traffic deaths decline sharply / News / The Foreigner

Child traffic deaths decline sharply. The number of children killed in Norwegian traffic accidents has reached its lowest level ever, according to new statistics. Deaths have declined 95 percent in the last 40 years, and none of the five killed last year was sitting in the car at the time. Minister of Transport and Communications Maghnild Meltveit Kleppa calls the figures “good news, even though every child that dies is one too many.”

childtrafficdeaths, norwegianpublicroadsadministration, magnhildmeltveitkleppa, norwegiancouncilforroadsafety



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Child traffic deaths decline sharply

Published on Thursday, 14th April, 2011 at 10:38 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 14th April 2011 at 10:59.

The number of children killed in Norwegian traffic accidents has reached its lowest level ever, according to new statistics.

Child in car seat (illustration photo)
Child in car seat (illustration photo)
Photo: treehouse1977/Flickr


Deaths have declined 95 percent in the last 40 years, and none of the five killed last year was sitting in the car at the time.

Minister of Transport and Communications Maghnild Meltveit Kleppa calls the figures “good news, even though every child that dies is one too many.”

She believes recent work to improve safety by car manufacturers and road authorities means measures are working.

“Even though we will probably never reach our goal of zero deaths, preventative measures combined with punitive action for traffic offences have produced results,” she tells Aftenposten.

Guro Ranes, head of the Norwegian Public Roads Administration (NPRA/Statens vegvesen), believes the most important factors are recent focus on in-car child safety, and physically separating pedestrians and cyclists from vehicles.

“It was quite normal for children to play in cars unsecured in the ’70s, with hardly any seatbelts in front. There were no rear seatbelts until legislation made them compulsory in 1985. Child car seats came even later. Children also used to walk or cycle more frequently on roads. It is more usual for them to be driven, or use pedestrian and cycle paths these days. Low speed limits in the vicinity of schools and residential areas also help.”

The Norwegian Council for Road Safety’s (Trygg Trafikk) information consultant, Simen Sunde says “kindergarten and schoolchildren [also] learn more about how to behave around traffic today.”

560 people died due to traffic-related accidents in 1970, 101 were children. 210 people in total were killed last year.




Published on Thursday, 14th April, 2011 at 10:38 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 14th April 2011 at 10:59.

This post has the following tags: childtrafficdeaths, norwegianpublicroadsadministration, magnhildmeltveitkleppa, norwegiancouncilforroadsafety.





  
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