Climate change challenges railways / News / The Foreigner

Climate change challenges railways. Norway’s infrastructure will have to be improved to tackle different weather in the future, experts say. Specialists at the Norwegian Directorate for Civil Protection and Emergency Planning (DSB) warn more rainy days this autumn mean railways must be better secured. A passenger train on the Røros Railway derailed last week, injuring eight passengers. This summer is thought to have been the wettest in northern Norway for the past 111 years.

norwayrailways, floodingclimatechange



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Climate change challenges railways

Published on Wednesday, 14th September, 2011 at 10:21 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.

Norway’s infrastructure will have to be improved to tackle different weather in the future, experts say.

Damaged part of Bergensbanen
Illustration of climate change challengesDamaged part of Bergensbanen
Photo: Jon-Anders Hefte/Jernbaneverket


Specialists at the Norwegian Directorate for Civil Protection and Emergency Planning (DSB) warn more rainy days this autumn mean railways must be better secured.

A passenger train on the Røros Railway derailed last week, injuring eight passengers. This summer is thought to have been the wettest in northern Norway for the past 111 years.

“What we know is that there will be more water in form of rain and that critical infrastructure must be protected. We need to start thinking about prevention. Also, we must take into account that weather will give us greater challenges in the future,” said DSB department director Per Brekke to NRK.

Director of Communications, Svein Horrisland, explained landslides will increasingly affect the railways, bringing new dimensioning demands.

“We must increase readiness and be prepared to base it on these when planning new rail lines if necessary”, said Mr. Horrisland.

According to Arnstein Watn, research director at SINTEF’s Department of Infrastructure, a lack of trained professionals means an increasing amount of money will have to be spent on developing competence and to educate new people.

“Climate change means more rain, more often. There is an acute need to implement measures because of the railways’ major maintenance lag. We have short-term needs by creating solutions that can cope with today’s weather conditions. In the long-run, we must find new solutions for completely different situations when planning and constructing on of new railway lines,” he concluded.




Published on Wednesday, 14th September, 2011 at 10:21 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.

This post has the following tags: norwayrailways, floodingclimatechange.





  
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