‘Climate deal failure unsustainable’, warns Norway PM / News / The Foreigner

‘Climate deal failure unsustainable’, warns Norway PM. Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg appealed to COP17 delegates gathered in Durban to act now or start paying the price. “Emissions are increasing at an accelerating pace. We cannot afford to give up. We cannot just sit and wait,” he said in his UN Climate Summit address. Scientists are alarmed at the latest global warming figures suggesting CO2 levels are now at their highest for 800,000 years. Norway’s rose to a ten-year high, emitting 53.7 million tonnes of CO2 equivalents. The country has dropped to 15th place on the Climate Change Performance Index, released today.

globalco2emissions, globalclimatechange, ciceronorway, durbancop17cmp7



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‘Climate deal failure unsustainable’, warns Norway PM

Published on Wednesday, 7th December, 2011 at 17:33 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg appealed to COP17 delegates gathered in Durban to act now or start paying the price.

PM Stoltenberg in Durban, COP17
Norway Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg in Durban before flying to Australia, Thursday.PM Stoltenberg in Durban, COP17
Photo: Tone Hertzberg/MD


Gloomy

“Emissions are increasing at an accelerating pace. We cannot afford to give up. We cannot just sit and wait,” he said in his UN Climate Summit address.

Scientists are alarmed at the latest global warming figures suggesting CO2 levels are now at their highest for 800,000 years. Norway’s rose to a ten-year high, emitting 53.7 million tonnes of CO2 equivalents. The country has dropped to 15th place on the Climate Change Performance Index, released today.

The PM arrived at the conference with few expectations of reaching a new deal to replace the 1997 Kyoto Protocol.

“I remember the optimism in Kyoto when we agreed on the Kyoto Protocol, a legally binding agreement covering about half of total global emissions. An agreement introducing new and important flexible mechanisms for the transfer of technology and funding to the developing countries, and an agreement that has laid the foundation for a global carbon market that is beneficial for both developed and developing countries,” declared the Norwegian PM.

“I travelled home from Kyoto with a sense of optimism that we collectively had made a historic step in addressing our common challenge of climate change. Let us be honest. Our optimism from Kyoto was unfounded”, he said, “Since then we have suffered serious setbacks and disappointments. From Kyoto to Durban, the Protocol has shrunk to a third of its potential. It could end up covering only fifteen per cent of global emissions instead of fifty.”

He also stated his concern climate change has had on indigenous people and how it has put them at risk.

“Floods, cyclones and drought are putting millions at risk. We will all be affected. But the peoples that are most vulnerable, will be the most severely hit.”

Money

Having listed encouraging examples of climate measures introduced by Australia, with its carbon pricing, and Brazil – a REDD+ Partner – reducing its deforestation, amongst others, the PM moved on to financing.

He talked of the need to “kick-start the Green Climate Fund”, the subject of failed United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC) talks in Bonn in 2010.

PM Stoltenberg promised Norway would cover its financial commitments for a rapid implementation, but added, “A fund without funding is not very helpful. Therefore, we must work to mobilise climate finance.”

A High-Level Advisory Group on Climate Finance meeting, co-Chaired by the PM and his Ethiopian counterpart PM Meles Zenawi, discussed raising USD 100 billion per year until 2020.

Saying the COP16Cancún agreement gave us a good basis for moving forward”, which he argued could supplement and build on the Kyoto Protocol, PM Stoltenberg concluded his address with an appeal.

“A balanced Durban package of decisions including a robust commitment will pave the way for securing a meaningful future for the Kyoto Protocol. If we also manage to make the Green Climate Fund operational, we have made significant progress [...] we cannot miss this opportunity. We cannot afford to fail. Let us make Durban a new start towards a global climate agreement.”



Published on Wednesday, 7th December, 2011 at 17:33 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: globalco2emissions, globalclimatechange, ciceronorway, durbancop17cmp7.





  
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