Committee quashes spy case appeal / News / The Foreigner

Committee quashes spy case appeal. Authorities have denied convicted Norwegian spy Arne Treholt a fourth chance to get his case reopened. In Norway’s biggest-ever espionage case, Mr Treholt was sentenced to 20 years imprisonment in 1985 after being found guilty of spying. Mr Treholt had been under round-the-clock surveillance for a period of one-and-a-half years, and there were claims the CIA were involved. Fabrication?

arnetreholtspycase, policesecurityservice



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Committee quashes spy case appeal

Published on Thursday, 9th June, 2011 at 17:02 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Authorities have denied convicted Norwegian spy Arne Treholt a fourth chance to get his case reopened.

Arne Treholt at Fornebu before his arrest
Arne Treholt at Fornebu before his arrest
Photo: PST/Flickr


In Norway’s biggest-ever espionage case, Mr Treholt was sentenced to 20 years imprisonment in 1985 after being found guilty of spying.

Mr Treholt had been under round-the-clock surveillance for a period of one-and-a-half years, and there were claims the CIA were involved.

Fabrication?

Used to convict him was a central piece of evidence found during a police raid on his Oslo apartment, an attaché case containing bundles of dollar bills allegedly paid by former Soviet Republic officials for his services.

Negatives from photographs of the briefcase taken at the time show pieces of tape that formed part of the right-hand-side latches. These were missing from photos police presented at his trial.

Meanwhile, hopes of a pardon were raised last year following publication of a book, “Forfalskning – Politiets løgn i Treholt-Saken”, which sparked off a series of events.

The book contains allegations subsequent police photographic proof, taken when Mr Treholt was arrested with his case at Fornebu Airport, had been tampered with. This has  been confirmed by independent British forensic experts, although a former Police Security Service (PST, formerly POT) agent has denied this.

Moreover, one former agent claims the Russian money was planted, and the owner of a photographic shop admits police asked him to manipulate a photograph of Mr Treholt to make it seem as though he was speaking with former KGB head in Norway, Leonid Makarov.

Much of the Norwegian media also decided to sue the state to gain access to classified trial material, alleging the PST was deliberately withholding it.

Just before today’s hearing, NRK published the entire collection of sound recordings made during Mr Treholt’s many interrogations.

“We saw no reason not to publish them after having conducted a complete ethical press review and were sure we had all the material,” head of broadcasting Hans Tore Bjerkaas tells his own reporters.

“Prestige-infected eyes”

At today’s press conference, head of the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC/Gjenopptakelseskommisjonen), Helen Sæter,  justifies their unanimous decision to deny reopening the legal case yet again, saying, “we have not found proof of either any evidence-tampering or that any false statements have been made.”

“We [also] base this [or decision] on that there was no tape on the briefcase and do not know what mandate, or what conditions the British experts were given.”

Criticising the CCRC, Arne Treholt says “I had expected it would have been possible to examine this matter with slightly less prestige-infected eyes, as so many years have passed since my 1985 conviction. We are now going to discuss what further steps to take, but I wish to underline once more that the last word has not been said in this matter.”



Published on Thursday, 9th June, 2011 at 17:02 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: arnetreholtspycase, policesecurityservice.





  
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